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In this issue

Home is the theme for this issue. You will be pleasantly surprised by both the widely divergent (and imaginative) takes of the writers, as well as the echoes across the spectrum of articles. In a panoramic sweep, Rimli Sengupta uses the story of her family’s exodus from East Pakistan in “House Keys” to look at forced mass migration elsewhere, in Europe and currently from Myanmar westward into Bangladesh. Kaushik Barua writes about the notion of home for the immigrants in Europe and the transient nature of their lives in “The Wandering Tribes”. Rashmi Sawhney scans Indian cinema to uncover the idea of home in di erent scenarios in “The Moving Image”. While Anand Vivek Taneja describes the homes of the self-proclaimed Begum of Awadh, rst at New Delhi Railway Station and later in a ruin of a hunting lodge in New Delhi in “The Descendants”, Latha Anantharaman writes about a house in Kerala that she and her husband built in “How to Grow a House”. Two archi- tects focus on the kind of homes we now live in or aspire to: Hemant Burte laments the obscenity of Kubla Khan fantasies of homes and high-rises made real in a nation of poor people in “Home Front”, and Gautam Bhatia, despairing of the present, imagines (and draws) sustainable houses in the future in “The Small House”. Mitali Saran’s home is even smaller: turning inwards, she considers her body her home in “Where the Heart Is”.

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