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Voyage of no return The mystery of what happened to Sir John Franklin and his 129-man crew who sailed off to find the Northwest Passage in 1845 is examined in a new exhibition at the National Maritime Museum. Roger Williams Casting director Artist Marc Quinn explains how the fragmentary nature of antiquities has inspired many of his own works including his 12 latest sculptures currently installed in Sir John Soane’s Museum. Michael Squire The colossus of Rome After the gladiators moved out of the Colosseum, the world’s largest amphitheatre has played many different roles, from a stone quarry and a church to a film location and a tourist attraction. Dalu Jones The archaeologist of artists Most Victorians and 1960s’ hippies loved the work of Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema – the art critic John Ruskin wasn’t so keen. Now it is on show in London, you can decide for yourself. Dominic Green Golden years The measurement of time has seldom been depicted in so decorative a manner as in the delightful 17th- and 18th-century French calendars and almanacs displayed at Waddesdon Manor. Theresa Thompson Much more on Moore Classical sculpture had little impact on the work of Sir Henry Moore early on in his career – as a young man he much preferred Sumerian, Cycladic and Mayan figures. Dr Hannah Higham Last man standing After Alexander the Great died, his generals scrambled for power and fought among themselves. One of them, Seleucus I Nicator, founded the vast Seleucid Empire that lasted nearly 300 years. Bryan Short

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