Brahmos Displays Its 450-Km Reach
Geopolitics|April 2017

The revelation that the BrahMos supersonic missile can and does reach targets far beyond the 400-km range has finally established the long unspoken truth about its capability. This can become a game-changer in the South Asian security context. A report.

After nearly two decades of downplaying the true range of BrahMos supersonic cruise missile, India finally came out in the open to declare that the missile can hit targets much beyond the originally declared range of 290 km. On March 11, 2017, India carried out a crucial test of the BrahMos missile, "as part of the capability enhancement endeavour", to announce that it had successfully hit targets at 450-km range.

The test was carried out from the Integrated Test Range at Chandipur at Sea in Balasore district of Odisha state, and was called "a major milestone" for the missile "with an extended range." In a historical first, the formidable missile system once again proved its mettle to precisely hit enemy targets at much higher range than the current range of 290 km, with supersonic speed of 2.8 Mach, an official statement said that day.

During the launch, the land-attack version of the supersonic cruise missile system met its mission parameters in a copybook manner. It was a text book launch achieving 100 per cent results, executed with high precision from the Mobile Autonomous Launcher (MAL) deployed in full configuration.

The unique BrahMos weapon system has empowered all three wings of the Indian armed forces with impeccable anti-ship and land attack capability. The technology upgrade comes after India's full membership to the Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR), which removed caps on range of BrahMos cruise missile in mid-2016.

"With the successful test firing of BrahMos Extended Range missile, BrahMos-ER, the Indian Armed Forces will be empowered to knock down enemy targets far beyond the 400-kms. BrahMos has thus proved its prowess once again as the best supersonic cruise missile system in the world," Dr. Sudhir Mishra, CEO & MD of BrahMos Aerospace, said from the launch site.

The new benchmark, which was set by Chairman DRDO Dr. S Christopher during Aero India 2017 in Bengaluru, has been remarkably achieved by BrahMos Aerospace. On February 15, 2017, Dr Christopher had said that India had decided to increase the range of the BrahMos supersonic cruise missile to 450-km from the present 290-km. "After India joined the Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR), Russia and India had executed a proposal for undertaking joint technical development work for extending the range of the BrahMos missile beyond the 290-km", he had said then.

This increase in the BrahMos strike range will be applicable to practically every platform that uses the weapon system. At present, India uses three types of BrahMos missiles: Block I, Block II and Block III. These are available in land-based and warship-launched versions. The aircraft launched version of the missile is currently in testing phase and is likely to be fired and tested by end of 2016 or in early 2017.

Continue reading your story on the app

Continue reading your story in the magazine

MORE STORIES FROM GEOPOLITICSView All

THE TEJAS AND TEJAS MK1A: HAL HAS TO DELIVER

The Tejas project is a litmus test of the ability of Indian designers and production agencies to produce a viable combat aircraft, argues SANJAY BADRI-MAHARAJ

10 mins read
Geopolitics
March 2021

THE QUAD AND BEYOND

Given the potentials as well as the contradictions within the QUAD, India has to maximise its options in order to participate successfully in the great game that is emerging in the Indo-Pacific, writes NINAD D SHETH

10+ mins read
Geopolitics
March 2021

SIGHT AT NIGHT ENHANCING NIGHT VISION CAPABILITIES OF THE INDIAN ARMED FORCES

With challenges persisting at the Line of Control and the Line of Actual Control, the Indian Army is on a modernisation spree. The army requires third and fourth generation NVDs which have a reduced halo effect, better picture clarity, more panoramic view and longer battery life, explains DHIRENDER SINGH JAMWAL

6 mins read
Geopolitics
March 2021

UAVS: INDIA HAS TO MOVE FORWARD

India has made some significant use of UAVs in its internal security operations and considerable use for military surveillance. However, its own development projects are still limited and have not yielded major products for military use. This is rapidly changing, explains SANJAY BADRI-MAHARAJ

10 mins read
Geopolitics
March 2021

ATMANIRBHAR IN EARNEST

Aero India was a homegrown affair with welcome signs of an indigenous defence manufacturing capability that is coming of age, writes C SANTHOSH

10+ mins read
Geopolitics
March 2021

COUNTER-DRONE TECHNOLOGIES: NASCENT, BUT WITH ENORMOUS POSSIBILITIES

Designing and developing new countermeasures will require substantial investments, but they should not be hindrances in innovation, writes R CHANDRAKANTH

7 mins read
Geopolitics
March 2021

A US-INDIA MILITARY PARTNERSHIP SANS QUAD

Arguing that India cannot depend on the QUAD framework to deal with a Chinese threat, AMIT GUPTA suggests that a realistic workable alliance with the United States based on a fruitful weapons partnership between the two countries and the provision of military basing is a much better option for New Delhi

10+ mins read
Geopolitics
March 2021

Make: Myth, Reality Or Pipedream?

Today, in India, the government has shown that they have the will under the strong leadership of Prime Minister Narendra Modi. They have also shown the way with DAP- 2020. Now it is up to the user, the bureaucracy and Indian industry to utilise both and move ahead, writes COL. ANDREW FERNANDES (RETD)

10+ mins read
Geopolitics
March 2021

Quad's Challenges In Bay Of Bengal

As the military takeover in Myanmar has provided a further opportunity to China to enhance its profile in the region, the Quad partners (India, Japan, Australia and the United States) have to reimagine their strategic plans for the Bay of Bengal area taking into consideration the importance of three regional stakeholders namely Myanmar, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka, argues P M HEBLIKAR

8 mins read
Geopolitics
March 2021

The Assam NRC Fiasco

With Assam electing a new assembly this month, the National Register of Citizens is going to be a highly emotive issue, which, if not handled properly, will create huge disorders in a state that is traditionally vulnerable to multiple insurgencies having serious strategic implications. RAJEEV BHATTACHARYYA enumerates factors contributing to the fiasco

9 mins read
Geopolitics
March 2021
RELATED STORIES

Reincarnation And Realpolitik

China, India, and the U.S. are vying to influence the selection of the next Dalai Lama

5 mins read
Bloomberg Businessweek
April 19, 2021

An Exclusive Interview With Nandakumar Narasimhan

The Little Red Train

10+ mins read
Lens Magazine
March 2021

A Room for Dad

Before Mom passed, I made a promise to her

8 mins read
Guideposts
April 2021

THE DANGAL IN THE JUNGLE, PART 1

YOU KNOW YOU’RE SOMEBODY WHEN YOU’VE APPEARED ON AN INDIAN DANGAL POSTER — IN OTHER WORDS, IN A WRESTLING ADVERTISEMENT.

6 mins read
Black Belt
April/May 2021

WOUNDS AND THE WOMB

JULIE PETERS explores how to heal a relationship with the sacred womb, a place of death, life, and possibilities.

8 mins read
Spirituality & Health
Mar/Apr 2021

BE SQUIRRELY

Giant squirrels, giant lessons? Animal chaplain SARAH BOWEN explores what squirrels can show us about mindfulness.

4 mins read
Spirituality & Health
Mar/Apr 2021

E8 Caste and the Indian Tech Ivies

IIT grads are highly sought after in Silicon Valley. Are they bringing deep-rooted prejudices with them?

10+ mins read
Bloomberg Businessweek
March 15, 2021

Life Changing

I was happily married, happily employed, just plain happy. Until the accident

8 mins read
Guideposts
February 2021

IN SEASON Chickpeas (GARBANZO BEANS)

Chickpeas appear in early recordings in Turkey well over 5000 years ago. India produces the most chickpeas worldwide but they are grown in more than 50 countries. An excellent source of carbohydrates, protein, fiber, B vitamins, and some minerals, they are a nutritious staple of many diets. The name chickpea comes from the Latin word cancer, referring to the plant family of legumes, Fabaceae. It is also known by its popular Spanish-derived name, the garbanzo bean. Kidney beans, black beans, lima beans, and peanuts are other familiar foods found in this legume family.

1 min read
Alternative Medicine
February 2021

When the Signal Goes Out

Government-ordered internet shutdowns are becoming more frequent

3 mins read
Bloomberg Businessweek
February 15 - 22, 2021