SOCPAC KEEN TO SHARE JOINT DOCTRINE AND TRAINING
Asian Military Review|June/July 2021
The return of Great Power competition means that US SOCPAC is more than ever seeking joint training opportunities with regional special forces.
Andrew White

Special Operations Forces (SOF) offer the US Department of Defense (DoD) a force-multiplying and flexible solution as it pivots towards countering aggression below the threshold of full conflict from the likes of the People’s Republic of China (PRC) and the Russian Federation.

As a unifying special operations command in the Indo-Pacific, the US Special Operations Command Pacific (SOCPAC) has become a critical tool for the US DoD and its Indo-Pacific Command (INDOPACOM) as it seeks to sustain relationships with dozens of SOF entities throughout the region, and counter PRC and Russian Federation activities.

Addressing the AFCEA TechNet Indo-Pacific Conference in Honolulu, Hawaii on 1 March, the US INDOPACOM commander, Admiral Phil Davidson described how SOF comprised an important element of the Joint Force as it seeks to shape the region.

Describing ongoing efforts to overcome shortfalls in the face of this “Great Power Competition”, Davidson explained how China remains emboldened to take action to supplant the established rules-based international order”.

The pivot towards operations associated with the Great Power Competition was first officially discussed by SOCPAC and its regional partners at the Transregional Resistance Working Group (TRWG) in Monterey, California in February 2020.

The event, entitled The Role of SOF and Great Power Competition – Comparative Dialogue of Russia and China, featured the participation of SOF representatives from across the region, including Canada, Estonia, France, Georgia, Japan, Mongolia, New Zealand, South Korea, Sweden, Taiwan, Ukraine, the United Kingdom and the US.

SOCPAC, which is based out of Camp Smith on the Hawaiian island of O’ahu, is ideally suited to supporting the INDOPACOM’s main effort which is to “provide combat credible deterrence to protect free and open access to trade routes through the air, sea, land, space, and cyberspace”.

To effectively deter, we need to arm the Joint Force with the proper capabilities, capacities, authorities, and indeed the doctrine to support rapid force employment, accurate offensive power, and effective defenses,” Davidson explained at the AFCEA event.

Supported by SOF elements from the Army’s 1st Special Forces Group, based at Torii Garrison; the US Air Force’s (USAF’s) 353rd Special Operations Group, based at Yokota Air Base; and the US Navy’s Special Warfare Unit One, based in Guam; SOCPAC is tasked with strengthening ties with allies and partners throughout the region.

“Our constellation of allies and partners is the backbone of the free and open international order, providing a powerful force to counter malign activity and aggression. We are seeking every opportunity to increase the frequency and intensity of our combined operations, exercises, and training with our allies and partners,” Davidson explained.

“Even in the face of the COVID pandemic, we are increasing our interoperability and compatibility across the region to enhance our capabilities and improve our coordination for competition. This manifests itself in information sharing agreements, foreign military sales, expanded military cooperation, and international security dialogues – such as TechNet – designed to address our mutual security concerns alongside our closest allies and partners.”

COVID disrupts training

SOCPAC is also able to support INDOPACOM’s final focus area which comprises “exercises, experimentation, and innovation” according to Davidson.

“The most effective way to combat the security challenges and demonstrate our resolve in today’s dynamic operating environment is through a continuous campaign of joint experimentation and high-fidelity, multi-domain training,” he explained.

Continue reading your story on the app

Continue reading your story in the magazine

MORE STORIES FROM ASIAN MILITARY REVIEWView All

SMART MUNITIONS INCREASE MARKET SHARE

Top attack munitions are now widely developed for different artillery calibers with varied ranges.

10 mins read
Asian Military Review
June/July 2021

NEXT GEN NVGS - A CLEAR IMPROVEMENT

Fused and enhanced night-vision technology will make the difference to soldiers fighting at night.

8 mins read
Asian Military Review
June/July 2021

MILITARY ROTORCRAFT DEVELOPMENT - NO MORE ‘STOVEPIPES'

New rotorcraft are going to come with new abilities founded on open systems that provide easier upgrade paths and cheaper through life costs.

8 mins read
Asian Military Review
June/July 2021

INDO PACIFIC UAV DIRECTORY 2021

The development of unmanned aerial vehicles is growing apace, especially in China. New longer range ISR platforms are also on the procurement list of several nations.

10+ mins read
Asian Military Review
June/July 2021

TIME TO RESET TRILATERAL RELATIONS

United States President Joe Biden has made it a top priority of his Administration to repair and re-energize global alliances during its first year in power. This is a necessary strategic and political calculus made in light of growing global security, public health, and environmental challenges that will require cooperation and multilateral contributions. President Trump’s ‘America first’ policy did much to undermine confidence in such relationships over his time in office.

3 mins read
Asian Military Review
June/July 2021

SOCPAC KEEN TO SHARE JOINT DOCTRINE AND TRAINING

The return of Great Power competition means that US SOCPAC is more than ever seeking joint training opportunities with regional special forces.

9 mins read
Asian Military Review
June/July 2021

MARINE ENGINE POWER - NOT JUST ABOUT KNOTS

Navies not only want more engine power, there are also coming under increasing pressure to become environmentally conscious.

9 mins read
Asian Military Review
June/July 2021

AMPHIBIOUS FORCES

New amphibious concepts are re-shaping marine forces to break the A2AD defensive line.

9 mins read
Asian Military Review
June/July 2021

SPACE V AIRBORNE ISR OR MIX AND MATCH

Owning satellite based ISR for military use is still an exclusive ‘club’, but airborne ISR still provides that most countries need.

9 mins read
Asian Military Review
April/May 2021

SHIPBUILDING - A NUMBERS GAME

While experience grows among Indo-Pacific naval designers, order numbers remain crucial to keeping costs down and yards in business.

10+ mins read
Asian Military Review
April/May 2021
RELATED STORIES

The New Fighter At the CFPB

Rohit Chopra wants to know more about tech companies’ plans for financial products

5 mins read
Bloomberg Businessweek
December 06, 2021

Next on Your Plate: Bug Burgers

The faux-meat industry is starting to explore fruit fly patties and mealworm nuggets

4 mins read
Bloomberg Businessweek
December 06, 2021

Ready Aim Omicron!

Drugmakers always knew variants would arise. The latest will test their preparedness

5 mins read
Bloomberg Businessweek
December 06, 2021

Crossing Borders With Crypto

A Mexico-based startup says it can send remittances from the U.S. cheaper and faster

5 mins read
Bloomberg Businessweek
December 06, 2021

A Crash Course in Omicronomics

Sussing out the impact of the new coronavirus variant on growth and inflation

4 mins read
Bloomberg Businessweek
December 06, 2021

Treasure Hunters Of the Stalled Supply Chain

For salvage companies, an unclaimed shipping container is a potentially profitable mystery box

6 mins read
Bloomberg Businessweek
December 06, 2021

In the EV Age, Hyundai Still Has High Hopes for Hydrogen Cars

The South Korean automaker sees fuel-cell technology as key to decarbonizing global transportation

4 mins read
Bloomberg Businessweek
December 06, 2021

The Next Accounting Fiasco

Twenty years after Enron’s failure, investors are still vulnerable to corporate numbers games

5 mins read
Bloomberg Businessweek
December 06, 2021

When Same-Day Delivery Is Too Slow

Gopuffis trying to outrace its competitors in the “dark convenience store” business

6 mins read
Bloomberg Businessweek
December 06, 2021

Health The growing influence of Apple on healthcare

In a 2019 interview with Mad Money’s Jim Cramer, Apple CEO Tim Cook said: “If you zoomed out into the future, and you look back, and you ask the question, ‘What was Apple’s greatest contribution to mankind?’” After a short pause, he answered his own question: “It will be about health.” Two years on, his vision is already becoming a reality for the company.

5 mins read
AppleMagazine
December 03, 2021