Six months into outbreak, cruise lines still repatriating crews by ship
Professional Mariner|October - November 2020
Though the COVID-19 pan-demic brought passenger travel to a halt for all major ocean-going cruise lines, many ships were still sailing an estimated 15,000 to 20,000 crewmembers to their home countries in July, according to the Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA).
Amy Paradysz

“What cruise lines have been doing is taking the ships around the world to repatriate crewmembers directly by (sea),” said Donnie Brown, vice president of maritime policy for CLIA. “It has been a Herculean effort.”

Crews are incredibly multinational. In the case of Carnival Corp., for example, crewmembers come from over 110 countries. Cruise lines had to navigate widely varied and evolving border control and health policy restrictions for each country, including those that weren’t allowing their own nationals to re-enter — sometimes specifically because they had been on a cruise ship.

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