Project Suzuki TS400 Part 8 Loom with a view!
Classic Motorcycle Mechanics|September 2021
We’re getting down into the nitty-gritty this time with component testing and loom building. What could go wrong?
STEVE COOPER AND FERRET

Scoop here! Testing electrical components is for me something of a penance. I end up with lots of notes, some arbitrarily arrived at values and often only a warm, fuzzy feeling that I think I know all is well.

I’ve built a wiring loom but it wasn’t as easy as it might have been, but that’s down to my issues being unable to differentiate certain colours easily. Suzuki’s light green, pale blue and grey cables all seem to blend into one when I have them next to each other. All of which is reason enough in my mind to get the Messiah of Wire to sort out the TS400 Apache! So, without any further ado, here’s Ferret!

Ferret here again for my penultimate missive on Scoop’s Apache. Testing a rectifier is a quick and simple process, requiring nothing more than a multimeter and a basic level of proficiency regarding its use. Nearly all meters have a facility to test diodes, and the TS400’s rectifier comprises six of them. A diode is simply a one-way valve for electricity. Current will flow through it in one direction, but not the other. Its purpose is to convert the AC current coming from the alternator into DC current, which is what the battery requires. Putting AC current into a battery does not go down at all well in much the same way that you’d not be too happy if your wages were paid to you in Dollars or Euros!

The rectifier on the TS has five wires. One is red (DC positive), one is black/white (DC negative) and the other three are all yellow (AC input). For a bit more clarity, we’ll break the test procedure into four stages. First, however, turn the meter’s dial to the ‘diode test’ setting; there should be a little diode symbol on there somewhere. It’s often the same as, or next to, the audible continuity setting. The meter’s display should now show something like ‘1’ or ‘OL’.

The first stage of the test is to connect the red lead from the meter to the red wire of the rectifier and the black lead of the meter to each of the rectifier’s yellow wires in turn. In each case the meter display should remain as before, with no reading obtained, indicating that there is no current flowing through the diode in this direction.

Now, reverse the meter leads so that the black meter lead is connected to the red wire of the rectifier and the red meter lead to each of the three yellows in turn. Now there should be a reading on the display along the lines of ‘.562’ or ‘.547’. The exact values shown are not really important, but they should all be in the same ballpark. This indicates that there is now current flowing through the diode in question. All good so far? Carry on, we’re halfway there…

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