Scotland Makes Periods Less Painful
Bloomberg Businessweek|December 07, 2020
The country is the first in the world to offer free, universal access to sanitary products
Caroline Alexander

On Nov. 24, Scotland became the first country in the world to establish through legislation that access to period products is a right, a move that First Minister Nicola Sturgeon described as groundbreaking. It caps a four-year campaign led by Monica Lennon, a member of the Scottish Parliament, that was backed by a wide coalition of trade unions, women’s groups, and charities.

The aim, Lennon says, is to eradicate “period poverty”—the cost of the products can be prohibitive—and end the stigma around menstruation.

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