Scotland Makes Periods Less Painful
Bloomberg Businessweek|December 07, 2020
The country is the first in the world to offer free, universal access to sanitary products
Caroline Alexander

On Nov. 24, Scotland became the first country in the world to establish through legislation that access to period products is a right, a move that First Minister Nicola Sturgeon described as groundbreaking. It caps a four-year campaign led by Monica Lennon, a member of the Scottish Parliament, that was backed by a wide coalition of trade unions, women’s groups, and charities.

The aim, Lennon says, is to eradicate “period poverty”—the cost of the products can be prohibitive—and end the stigma around menstruation.

Continue reading your story on the app

Continue reading your story in the magazine

MORE STORIES FROM BLOOMBERG BUSINESSWEEKView All

How to Survive A Bubble

No one can be sure if markets are too high—but your emotions probably are

7 mins read
Bloomberg Businessweek
January 25, 2021

PELOTON WANTS TO BE MORE THAN A PANDEMIC FAD

In March, a couple of weeks after sweeping stay-at-home orders had brought much of the U.S. to a halt, William Lynch says he realized Peloton Interactive Inc. would fare really well in the year of the pandemic.

5 mins read
Bloomberg Businessweek
January 25, 2021

HELP IS ON THE WAY But the world still needs a shot in the arm!

The economic outlook is starting to brighten just about everywhere you look

8 mins read
Bloomberg Businessweek
January 25, 2021

Drugstores To the Rescue

Pharmacy chains aim to boost the vaccine rollout—and their bottom lines

4 mins read
Bloomberg Businessweek
January 25, 2021

China Tightens Its Grip on Fintech

In late 2020, as Jack Ma’s Ant Group Co. prepared for a $35 billion initial public offering, many outside China wondered if the country’s financial technology giants were becoming a global competitive threat to U.S. and European banks and payments companies. Ant’s Alipay app, used for everything from hailing cabs to investing, had already rewired financial services in the world’s second-largest economy. There was just one problem: Inside China, policymakers were growing uneasy about the sudden dominance of their homegrown superstars.

3 mins read
Bloomberg Businessweek
January 25, 2021

China Comes For Its Tech Giants

The Chinese government’s crackdown on the country’s largest technology companies has raised fears that the industry could be paralyzed or cast into disarray as the economy enters a delicate moment. But one contingent within the tech sector is privately cheering on a broad set of anti-monopoly edicts: startups and their investors.

2 mins read
Bloomberg Businessweek
January 25, 2021

Charging DUES, Making DO

Phil and Erin Lockwood never imagined their family would be traveling more during the coronavirus pandemic. But since joining the vacation club Inspirato last September, the parents of three have swapped one annual trip to a Disney theme park for villa rentals in Cabo San Lucas and Costa Rica.

2 mins read
Bloomberg Businessweek
January 25, 2021

Back-to-Work Blues?

Tech boomed during the pandemic. It may not last

4 mins read
Bloomberg Businessweek
January 25, 2021

ASIA'S BATTERY GIANTS GO GLOBAL

Leaders of the electric-car era are moving to cement their dominance

4 mins read
Bloomberg Businessweek
January 25, 2021

Test All of Minnesota? You Betcha

Minnesota is setting an example for other states and the federal government. If anyone is interested

10+ mins read
Bloomberg Businessweek
January 18, 2021
RELATED STORIES

Taking Scotland in Stride

A walk through the Highlands and Borders is the best way to touch this country’s history and nature

5 mins read
Business Traveler
December 2020/January 2021

GEOLOGY 101 Columnar Basalt

A distinctive volcanic structure found throughout the world has been given fanciful names: “Organ Pipes” in Namibia and Victoria, Australia; “Kilt Rock” and “Samson’s Ribs” in Scotland; “Giant’s Causeway” in Northern Ireland; “Thunderstruck Rocks” in Romania; “Devils Tower” in Wyoming and “Paul Bunyan’s Woodpile” in Utah, USA; the “Baigong Pipes” in China; and the “Cliff of Stone Plates” in Vietnam. High-resolution satellite images have even shown similar as-yet-unnamed structures on Mars.

1 min read
Rock&Gem Magazine
December 2020

Bass of Tomorrow

We can think of a few string manufacturers who claim to make the best-sounding products in the world. Dr Jonathan Kemp doesn’t just make that claim—he can prove it, too. Hywel Davies is blinded with science...

2 mins read
Bass Player
July 2020

SONS OF THE REVOLUTION

Fifty years ago, the Shortboard Revolution saw the most radical design shifts in the history of surfcraft. Today, that same experimental spirit is alive and well in the surfing and shaping approaches of Torren Martyn and Simon Jones

10+ mins read
Surfer
Volume 61, Issue 1

Rock Shops of Distinction MR. WOOD'S FOSSILS

KEEPING A TRADITION ALIVE

10+ mins read
Rock&Gem Magazine
January 2020

Explore Scotland's Magical, Misty Isle Of Skye

Don’t let the weather fool you — Skye can be “a wee bit moist” on occasion, as 19th-century Cuillin mountaineer pioneer Charles Pilkington once said, describing Scotland’s island of adventure.

5 mins read
Global Traveler
September 2018

Alan Cumming Celebrates the Good Life in Scotland

As The Good Wife takes its last bow, life is still a cabaret for Alan Cumming.

6 mins read
CBS Watch! Magazine
April 2016

Growing Icelandic poppies

Anne Swithinbank’s masterclass on: Icelandic poppies

2 mins read
Amateur Gardening
January 23, 2021

Where do we go from here?

Many game shoots are facing the dilemma of what to do with leftover birds, says Liam Bell

4 mins read
Shooting Times & Country
January 20, 2021

The value of venison

As we plunge back into lockdown, it is vital that all culled deer go into the food chain, says Megan Rowland

4 mins read
Shooting Times & Country
January 13, 2021