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Magazine Description

In this issue

The first full issue of the year and decade offers a line-up centred on technology, continuous learning and community – all of which are important to the future of design and architecture. The commitment to advancing knowledge is always a good resolution to have and we advocate this through a feature on different Master of Architecture programs you can take up. Successively, the focus shifts to virtual reality. Our bets are on this immersive tool revolutionising the architectural design process and we introduce a few companies that you should be acquainted with. Of the project features, the 10 we have curated this issue each represents one or more of the themes important to us at d+a. The cover is of A Simple Headquarters, the corporate office of car dealership Wearnes Automotive. Aesthetically striking, it is designed by Pencil Syndicate and embodies that ideal balance of form and function. There are two projects located in India; one, a Hindu temple, and the other, a house. Temple In Stone and Light is a contemporary interpretation of this traditional place of worship. Chhavi, the Desert House conforms to the ancient Indian architectural principles of Vastu Shastra. Another abode published in this issue is House68 by Design Collective Architects. The residence is an adroit composition of materials and bespoke parts divided into three distinct pavilions, giving it a five-star resort aesthetic. We close the issue with a possible solution for mass, affordable housing. TECLA, as the project is named, has a structure made from reusable, recyclable materials taken from the local terrain and produced by a 3D printer. This is a topic that has dominated headlines around the world and it is heartening to learn how architects are harnessing technology to find an answer.

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