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This is an edition I look forward to more than the others. Although the magazine covers commercial spaces in every issue throughout the year, they are never like they are in a TRENDS Commercial Design Special. Inside the pages, you will find institutional spaces, hospitality projects, offices and residential high-rises; they are the best of the new projects from the world over. Must see is the Mumbai office designed by Planet 3 Studios, striking with its meandering wooden wall, the unconventional Kolkata school by Abin Design Studio, and One Central Park in Sydney by PTW Architects. One Central Park was once a brewery site, and this ambitious project has become a leading example of how to make a success of large-scale mixed-use development projects. Attention towards approaching mixed-use projects is also the point of discussion in Reza Kabul’s guest column this month. In the Building Conversations section, do read the interviews with architect Alan Abraham, developer Navin Raheja, and designer/architect Rahul Shankhwalkar, where they give valuable insights into the worlds of public design, real estate and hospitality design respectively. And in Portfolio, we revisit the Kochi Muziris Biennale 2014. It concluded early on in the year and inside is a photo-essay on some of the extraordinary artworks that were created for it. I visited Kochi just when the biennale was ending and met up with its founder Bose Krishnamchari. The first things I had said to him, was how proud I felt when I read ‘The Biennale City’ written boldly on top of the first archway that was the gateway into Fort Kochi. Happy reading. Preeti Singh

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