The Indian Quarterly - January - March 2018

Publisher: I&E Engine
Category: Art, Culture
Language: English
Frequency : Quarterly

Flash Sale! Save 63% on annual subscriptions. Valid till 21-01-2018

DurationAmountSavings
Single issue $ 1.99 -
1 Year $ 3.00
Save 63%

Just $0.75 per issue
Save 63%

Subscribe to Magzter GOLD and enjoy Unlimited reading of The Indian Quarterly Magazine (including old issues) along with 4,000+ other best-selling magazines and premium articles for just $9.99/Month!


The Indian Quarterly (IQ) is a national and international magazine. We hope that just as The New Yorker exhibits a distinctly Manhattan sensibility and always contains articles about New York City, IQ will manifest the fact that it is edited and published in Mumbai through its cosmopolitan and open-minded perspective on the world and on India. In fact, we hope to provide a unique way of interpreting our ever changing culture, and to define our own experiences through the strength of thought, ideas and imagery, be it in the form of fact, fiction, poetry, illustration or photography. IQ is therefore a paean to the polyphonic nature of reflection and the creativity that is its outcome.

Home is the theme for this issue. You will be pleasantly surprised by both the widely divergent (and imaginative) takes of the writers, as well as the echoes across the spectrum of articles. In a panoramic sweep, Rimli Sengupta uses the story of her family’s exodus from East Pakistan in “House Keys” to look at forced mass migration elsewhere, in Europe and currently from Myanmar westward into Bangladesh. Kaushik Barua writes about the notion of home for the immigrants in Europe and the transient nature of their lives in “The Wandering Tribes”. Rashmi Sawhney scans Indian cinema to uncover the idea of home in di erent scenarios in “The Moving Image”. While Anand Vivek Taneja describes the homes of the self-proclaimed Begum of Awadh, rst at New Delhi Railway Station and later in a ruin of a hunting lodge in New Delhi in “The Descendants”, Latha Anantharaman writes about a house in Kerala that she and her husband built in “How to Grow a House”. Two archi- tects focus on the kind of homes we now live in or aspire to: Hemant Burte laments the obscenity of Kubla Khan fantasies of homes and high-rises made real in a nation of poor people in “Home Front”, and Gautam Bhatia, despairing of the present, imagines (and draws) sustainable houses in the future in “The Small House”. Mitali Saran’s home is even smaller: turning inwards, she considers her body her home in “Where the Heart Is”.


Recent Issues

View All

Recent articles from The Indian Quarterly Magazine

View All

The Indian Quarterly

French Connections

The Indian Quarterly

Love In The Time Of Caste

The Indian Quarterly

An Open Goal

The Indian Quarterly

A Day In Jail

The Indian Quarterly

A Beating Heart Behind The Words

The Indian Quarterly

A Sensuous Geometry

Magazines from Art

View All

Magazines from Culture

View All
Too Good To End!
Offer extended for
05 days
19 hrs
17 min
28 sec
Read The Indian Quarterly Magazine and 4,000+ other magazines for just
$99.99 $49.99/year