The Indian Quarterly Magazine - July - December 2021Add to Favorites

The Indian Quarterly Magazine - July - December 2021Add to Favorites

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In this issue

For this issue, we got writers and illustrators, graphic storytellers and photographers to think hard about borders. What does it mean to be on one side or the other? Literally or metaphorically.
Thus, while Susan Smith documents the suffering of migrants on the US-Mexico border, Parni Ray wonders about all the men who defy the boundaries of their lives to disappear and create new ones. Pushpinder Singh Jamwal’s research on wetlands illuminates the absurdity of human-drawn borders—at least as far as migratory birds are concerned. Vidyun Sabhaney’s graphic essay is a report from a literal border, outside Delhi, where women farmers from Punjab have been protesting what they believe are unjust laws. Ranjita Ganesan tells the fascinating story of a man who lives on the fringes of society—a member of a former ‘criminal tribe’. Latika Nehra’s ceramic works push the boundaries of artistic convention while Thokchom Sony’s art is poised on the cusp of traditional expression and modern technique. Sukhada Tatke tells us about the multiple lines crossed in an interracial marriage while Preksha Sharma discusses what ‘her land’, located near a contentious international border, means to her. Jai Arjun Singh pays tribute to a man who inhabited his household but lived a world away, separated by class boundaries. And finally, Yahin RK’s photographs of the wild remind us humans to not trespass when we visit the jungle. As usual, there’s lots more, including cinema-focused pieces by Rochona Majumdar and Shrayana Bhattacharya, a graphic piece on a great cartoon figure by Bharath Murthy, an extract from architect Ramu Katakam’s memoir… And too much compelling fiction and poetry to list—because this is a special issue again, a particularly special one because it marks IQ’s entry into its tenth year.

The Image-Maker

Sukumar Ray’s most vivid images were saved for his classics of nonsense verse, but his singular eye, writes Nabarupa Bhattacharjee, found its earliest expression in photography

The Image-Maker

8 mins

The Nawab's Last Sigh

Rudely awakened by the fact of independent India, an aristocrat in Meerut clung to his past. Now, he tells Sunaina Kumar, all he has left are his memories of a glorious age.

The Nawab's Last Sigh

10 mins

The Guest

Vaiyavan is the nom de plume of MSP Murugesan. Born in 1936, he did sundry jobs before obtaining postgraduate degrees by correspondence and then served as an English and Tamil teacher till his retirement in 1996. His writing career began in 1956. Multifaceted and prolific, he has to his credit a long list of short story collections, novels, plays, literary essays, poems and children’s stories. He has won several awards including Tamil Nadu government awards for best book on culture (1982) and best science book (1992) and the Malcolm Adiseshiah award for active participation in neo-literacy activities (1996). In his short stories and novels, Vaiyavan revels in a zest for life. Humaneness is the hallmark of his work, as the pain and pleasure, trials and tribulations of people in different rungs of society are described in minute detail. —CGR

The Guest

10+ mins

The Birth of an Anthem

From right-wing slogan to moving patriotic song and now back to Hindu nationalistic war cry. Rimli Sengupta on the evolution of Vande Mataram

The Birth of an Anthem

10+ mins

The Birth of a Parent

The beginning of a new life can create other strange new lives, reflects Manidipa Mandal

The Birth of a Parent

10+ mins

The Unknown Soldier

One man wondered and worried about his disappeared brother all his life.His granddaughter continued the search. Preksha Sharma resurrects a man and his story

The Unknown Soldier

10+ mins

The Art Scene

For the new kid on the block, it certainly has pedigree. The Centre for Con-temporary Art, housed within Delhi’s Bikaner House complex, finally opened its portals to welcome art aficionados during this year’s edition of the India Art Fair. Nature Morte was invited to stage the centre’s much-awaited inaugural show, an opportunity the gallery found too irresistible to pass up. The ambitious exhibition it mounted, The Idea of the Acrobat, occupied both floors of the recently renovated building and brought together the works of a dozen well known artists in a multitude of media. The line-up included Bharti Kher, Atul Dodiya, Dayanita Singh, Shilpa Gupta, Ayesha Singh, Khyentse Norbu and LN Tallur to name but a few.

The Art Scene

3 mins

Long, Long Ago

Arundhuti Dasgupta and Utkarsh Patel recount obscure creation myths from around the world, many echoing each other

Long, Long Ago

10+ mins

Family Business

AT THE DINDUKKAL BUS DEPOT, the abortionist pushed her way through the crowd thronging the bus and finally managed to board it. She placed her travel bag beside her on the seat, calling out to her niece to hurry up. The young woman renewed her efforts to break free of the tangle of limbs and claim the seat reserved for her.

Family Business

10+ mins

A Goan Childhood

Fragments of memory of a time long gone, from a life lived far away. By Selma Carvalho

A Goan Childhood

9 mins

Postcard From Tokyo

A profound stillness underpins the world capital of frenzied materialism

Postcard From Tokyo

8 mins

Love In The Time Of Caste

Since October 2012 Meena Kandasamy has been visiting Dalit settlements in Dharmapuri, Tamil Nadu, where an inter-caste marriage resulted in horrifying violence. Excerpts from a work in progress

Love In The Time Of Caste

7 mins

The Biological Imperative

Shougat Dasgupta reflects on the politics of parenthood. And loving your children

The Biological Imperative

10 mins

A Beating Heart Behind The Words

What do we write about when we write about love, asks Janice Pariat

A Beating Heart Behind The Words

10+ mins

Family Lore

We tell stories to make sense of ourselves, writes Jerry Pinto. But our origins, the people closest to us, are mysteries that resist explanation.

Family Lore

10+ mins

Through the Looking-Glass

And what children find there. Paro Anand reflects on the ugly families of children’s fiction and why it’s important that they be portrayed.

Through the Looking-Glass

8 mins

Postcard From Beijing

Reflections on home and the world from across the Great Wall

Postcard From Beijing

4 mins

The Hour Of Poetry

They say it’s enjoying a revival. Why poetry never really goes away

The Hour Of Poetry

5 mins

Shared History

Conservationist Abha Narain Lambah pays tribute to Sharada Dwivedi and Rahul Mehrotra, lovers all of Bombay’s splendid, layered past

Shared History

2 mins

Nowhere Man

In a hierarchical society is there any greater privilege than being able to declare yourself free of class, wonders, Shougat Dasgupta

Nowhere Man

10 mins

The Aristoprats

A year of dating a feudal throwback forced Shrayana Bhattacharya to confront her fascination with the wealthy

The Aristoprats

10+ mins

Home and Away

Where do artists come from, asks Kishore Singh. What nationality do we ascribe to works of art? And should it matter?

Home and Away

9 mins

Morbid Curiosities

Ambarish Satwik on his days as a student of anatomy, poking around in cadavers and studying photographs of extravagantly diseased bodies.

Morbid Curiosities

8 mins

The Long Night of the Bhikshu

THE EVENING HAD MOVED IN ON him almost unsuspectedly, grey cloud leading to grey drizzle. It was only when the bullfrogs started croaking that he realised it was dark.

The Long Night of the Bhikshu

8 mins

Utopia Lost

The once-bohemian Cholamandal Artists’ Village is now a staid 50 years old.

Utopia Lost

4 mins

Real-Life Dummies

One of the world’s great tourist traps, a Victorian relic, comes to India.

Real-Life Dummies

4 mins

High Culture

Mountain heritage is as fragile as its environment. Conservationist Anupam Sah recounts his Kumaon childhood, describes the similarity of traditions across the Himalaya and prescribes an approach to preserving this precious heritage, both built and intangible.

High Culture

8 mins

French Connections

Why the latest edition of Bonjour India will be an affair to remember

French Connections

5 mins

A Day In Jail

Encountering talent, hard work and hope in an unlikely setting

A Day In Jail

3 mins

An Open Goal

Hosting the under-17 World Cup is a chance for India to become a football nation

An Open Goal

3 mins

Read all stories from The Indian Quarterly

The Indian Quarterly Magazine Description:

PublisherI&E Engine

CategoryArt

LanguageEnglish

FrequencyQuarterly

The Indian Quarterly (IQ) is a national and international magazine. We hope that just as The New Yorker exhibits a distinctly Manhattan sensibility and always contains articles about New York City, IQ will manifest the fact that it is edited and published in Mumbai through its cosmopolitan and open-minded perspective on the world and on India.

In fact, we hope to provide a unique way of interpreting our ever changing culture, and to define our own experiences through the strength of thought, ideas and imagery, be it in the form of fact, fiction, poetry, illustration or photography. IQ is therefore a paean to the polyphonic nature of reflection and the creativity that is its outcome.

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