A User's Guide to Living - Part 6 - TRUTH & AUTHENTICITY
Heartfulness eMagazine|June 2020
DAAJI continues his series on everyday living, introducing the fifth universal principle of the User’s Guide, which is about truthfulness and acceptance of whatever hardships come our way. As a starting point, this fifth principle helps us to live a contented, peaceful life, with acceptance and compassion. Then, as we progress, it guides us towards the ultimate nature of Truth and Reality.
DAAJI

The Practice

1 Create a daily morning meditation practice scientifically

2 Fill your heart with love before starting meditation and before sleeping

3 Fix your goal and do not rest until you attain it

Essential values

4 Live simply to be in tune with Nature

5 Be truthful & accept challenges as being for your betterment

Behavior Being to Doing

6 Know everyone as one, treating them equally & harmoniously

7 Do not seek revenge for the wrongs done by others, instead always be grateful

8 Honor the resources you are given as sacred, with an attitude of purity, including food and money

Leadership

9 Become a role model by inspiring love and sacredness in others. Accept the richness of their diversity, while also accepting that we are all one

Continuous Improvement

10 Introspect daily before bedtime, so as to correct your faults and avoid making the same mistake twice

Principle 5:

Always be truthful, accept miseries as coming from God for your own good and be thankful.

The nature of truth

This is a vast topic, so we will start at the level of day-to-day behavior and then progress toward the ultimate Truth of existence.

Some of you may know the famous statement of Polonius in Shakespeare’s play, Hamlet, “This above all: to thine own self be true. And it must follow, as the night the day, thou canst not then be false to any man.” It is a universal principle that is valued in all cultures – to be genuine, original and authentic; to say what you mean and mean what you say; no hidden agendas, no masks; no hiding faults and no camouflage. Instead, only childlike innocence, purity and simplicity. Truthfulness means integrity, where thoughts are aligned with words, and words are aligned with actions. Where we walk the talk.

When we don’t walk the talk there is a disconnect and a sense of hypocrisy. The result is the pollution and corruption of our conscious and subconscious mind. We feel uncomfortable in our own skin, and that lowers our vibration – because we are not listening to the authentic voice of the heart.

Truth or satya is one of the very first principles in Ashtanga Yoga. In other words, it is fundamental and basic. And yet, the fact that Babuji has to remind us to always be truthful can only mean that falseness is hidden somewhere within us, otherwise we would not need to be reminded. Does a small child need to be told to be truthful? No, because they have no awareness of anything else, so we would instill the wrong seeds in the child if we did. We don’t need to interfere with the purity and innocence of truth when it does exist.

But authenticity is not so simple to achieve. Our multiple personas are driven by our subconscious minds, hardwired into our neural pathways as a result of years of habitual behavior, and they are often not within our awareness or control. That is the dilemma we face as human beings – we know the importance of transparency and truthfulness, but we do not know how to manifest them in our lives. Our lens on reality is hampered by our past complexities, subconscious patterns and tendencies.

And it is cumulative – the more layers of complexity we add, the more difficult it becomes to listen to the voice of the heart and follow it, so the more easily we follow wrong guidance. When we suffer from an untruthful heart and the coercions that result from it, it leads to an even greater lack of authenticity, so our inner environment is messed up and wrong habits are perpetuated.

And when we do try to be truthful without purity of consciousness, we often end up hurting others in the process, because our intentions are not always pure. So, while it is good to be truthful, until we arrive at inner purity we may not be able to express that truth without hurting others. When we do hurt others, even unintentionally, guilt often develops, and guilt is difficult to remove. It can only be done through genuine prayerful repentance and letting go at bedtime. And this brings us to another important aspect of being truthful – to accept our own failings with humility and genuinely offer them in a prayerful state. It purifies our system of guilty feelings, which are the hardest impressions to remove.

Related to this is another challenge we face: Can we cultivate truthfulness mindfully? Not really. The result will be superficial because truthfulness is dependent on purifying the full spectrum of consciousness – subconscious, conscious and superconscious – and to do that we require a method that reprograms more than just the conscious mind. Some people try to do it through hypnosis, but hypnosis is a very primitive and laborious approach compared to the Heartfulness Cleaning. Unless and until we have removed all the layers of complexity from the subconscious mind, it is not possible.

Truthfulness emerges from within, once we remove all the overlaying complexities. Truthfulness is our inherent nature. In fact, once we try to correct it mindfully, it means we have lost the connection somewhere. Practicing truthfulness mindfully is like practicing compassion, or practicing self-acceptance; it is good that we are aware of the principles, but we need to adopt the right approach. In this case, the right approach is to expose ourselves to the inner Reality, become one with it, and dissolve in that inner state. When we are in osmosis with that inner state, truth expresses naturally, without the need for any artificial efforts. That is what this principle 5 is all about.

To spread truthfulness, we don’t need effort or external force, just as to love someone we don’t need effort. To hate someone is a different matter – we have to think over it. To do rightful things we don’t need effort; to do wrongful things we need effort. To fabricate lies we consume a lot of energy, and to continue on the path of lies requires even more. It never ends.

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