Diamonds With Provenance
Verve|April - May 2020
In keeping with the company’s commitment to environmental and social responsibility, Anisa Kamadoli Costa, chief sustainability officer at Tiffany & Co. and chairman and president at The Tiffany & Co. Foundation, enlightens Shirin Mehta on the efforts that make the jewellery giant an industry leader in transparency
Shirin Mehta

Yes, diamonds are forever but would you forever cherish, however brilliant, a stone that you know nothing about? Especially now that you have seen Blood Diamond and recognised the truth about “conflict” or “blood” diamonds? (These are illegally traded stones that fund insurgencies and warlords in war-torn areas.) “Diamonds, formed up to three billion years ago and brought to the earth’s surface by a miracle of nature, are symbols of the most important moments in our lives. There should be nothing opaque about Tiffany diamonds,” says Alessandro Bogliolo, chief executive officer, Tiffany & Co. “Our clients want and deserve to know where their most valuable, most cherished diamond jewellery is from, and how it came to be.”

In keeping with a new tradition established last year, your solitaire from Tiffany now comes with its provenance included on the Tiffany Diamond Certificate for individually registered diamonds, alongside the stone’s other specifications — information not generally made available by the industry. Tiffany will soon also share each stone’s craftsmanship journey (such as the cutting and polishing workshop location). So you will have information on where your stone was dug up, who polished it and where. In cases where provenance is unknown (such as heritage stones that predate this policy), the brand will provide confirmation that the diamond was sourced through the leading practices of the industry.

For all lovers of fine jewellery and diamonds, Anisa Kamadoli Costa, chief sustainability officer at Tiffany & Co. and chairman and president at The Tiffany & Co. Foundation discusses the sharing of information on your stones that Tiffany provides….

How do you ensure that Tiffany & Co. operates in environmentally and socially responsible ways? Can you tell us something about your sustainability efforts?

Tiffany & Co. has a longstanding history in sustainability and focusing on the value of what happens at the origin of its supply chain. Our work really began back in 1995, when we opposed the development of a gold mine that threatened Yellowstone National Park in the United States. We realised then, that what happens at the origins of supply chains matters for the end product, for the brand and for our customers. Since then, Tiffany has been committed to conducting business responsibly, sustaining the natural environment and positively impacting the communities in which we operate. This is really the guiding principle that underpins the three core sustainability pillars of our business: our Product, our Planet, and our People.

Could you explain what Tiffany’s Diamond Source Initiative is about and how it protects the environment?

Continue reading your story on the app

Continue reading your story in the magazine

MORE STORIES FROM VERVEView All

SARTORIAL ECONOMICS

Sisters Tashi and Tara Mitra demonstrate to Akanksha Pandey how deviating from the mainstream can bend the way we think, live and dress

10+ mins read
Verve
April - May 2020

NOTES TO SELF

An anthropomorphized tiger’s perspective, a viscerally worded futuristic interpretation of loss, a critique of performative activism, a meta reflection on the earth’s crises. Told through different lenses, Janaki Lenin, Indrapramit Das, Keshava Guha and Roshan Ali’s stories — written exclusively for Verve — attempt to make sense of the fraught reality that we exist in today

10+ mins read
Verve
April - May 2020

The Eternal Optimist

As Generation X and xennials grapple with fully transitioning to conscious living, young millennials and Generation Z are leading the charge to reverse human-caused environmental damage. Sahar Mansoor, founder and CEO of the Bengaluru-based zero-waste social enterprise Bare Necessities, has a simple overarching philosophy: consume less and stay positive. Verve gets deeper into the mindset of the action-oriented earth advocate

10+ mins read
Verve
April - May 2020

Redemption SONGS

Indian music festivals have been demonstrating a refreshing sense of responsibility in terms of their ecological impact. Interacting with stakeholders who strive to make these large-scale events greener, Akhil Sood investigates the reasons behind the improved attitudes of audiences and the increase in corporate support.

10+ mins read
Verve
April - May 2020

earth hour

Crafted using nature’s elements, these dials draw inspiration from the many heterogeneous materials and hues around us.Verve turns its lens onto a mesmerising few

3 mins read
Verve
April - May 2020

THE KIDS ARE ALL RIGHT

Children are holding adults accountable for both the grim future they are facing and the toll this is taking on their mental health. Madhumita Bhattacharyya initiates conversations with families of young climate activists and observes the extent to which parenting has changed in the face of catastrophe

6 mins read
Verve
April - May 2020

NATURAL JUSTICE

Most of us are only just waking up to the urgency of climatic action. When the stakes are so high, what can individual action solve? Mridula Mary Paul, an environmental policy expert, is proof of the tenacity needed to effect systemic change. It’s not glamorous, and the rewards are few and far between, but that doesn’t stop her from aiming big, finds Anandita Bhalerao

9 mins read
Verve
April - May 2020

Along For The Ride

Navigating Indian streets as a woman is hard enough. But what is it like while riding a bicycle? Bengaluru-based Shreya Dasgupta, a regular cyclist, speaks to five urban women about the pros and cons of this increasingly popular means of transport.

8 mins read
Verve
April - May 2020

Diamonds With Provenance

In keeping with the company’s commitment to environmental and social responsibility, Anisa Kamadoli Costa, chief sustainability officer at Tiffany & Co. and chairman and president at The Tiffany & Co. Foundation, enlightens Shirin Mehta on the efforts that make the jewellery giant an industry leader in transparency

6 mins read
Verve
April - May 2020

Making Amends

This generation’s penchant for thoughtless consumption gets Madhu Jain roiled up, and she wonders if nature is getting its own back for our missteps…

3 mins read
Verve
April - May 2020