Canning - Bear Meat
Bear Hunting Magazine|January - February 2021
The last six months my non-hunting friends asking increasingly specific questions about how to turn animals into meat.
Tim Fowler

Grocery shortages in the early weeks of Covid-19 alarmed them about food security while I was sorting my inventory of bear, moose, elk, deer, grouse, pheasants, rabbits, pike, walleye, and other frozen proteins. They were astounded by my Instagram feed featuring all manner of game presented in delicious ways. Meanwhile, there was no chicken in the grocery coolers to be found and one of the largest beef processing plants in our area was shut down because of an outbreak. It got me thinking about how lucky we hunters are.

Then I remembered the time my freezer got unplugged. If you’ve ever lost a freezer full of meat, I understand your anguish. Early in my independent life, somehow the freezer became unplugged. A week passed and with it a whole year’s worth of steak, ground and roasts. It was rough. It was a lesson that has stuck with me.

I got to thinking maybe it was time to tear a page from grandma’s culinary playbook and fill my pantry with canned (bear) meat. Today’s pressure canners are safe, precision appliances that will save you time and money over a few years and free up high demand freezer space. Properly canned meat won’t go bad. Because of the slow moist heat, the process is perfect for tougher cuts and all the flavor is locked in the jar. If I would’ve canned some of that meat back then, we would have been further ahead. My hunting buddy told me about bottled moose and rabbits from when he hunted in Newfoundland. More than half of his hunting meals on that trip were based around meat that was home canned. He reported it delicious. I was skeptical. Recently I canned a batch of meat because my freezer is full to the gunnels, and I have un-punched moose, whitetail, and elk tags, with a high percentage of being successful.

Get the Right Equipment

Continue reading your story on the app

Continue reading your story in the magazine

MORE STORIES FROM BEAR HUNTING MAGAZINEView All

THE END OF 2020, CHALLENGES COMING IN 2021

SOMETHINGS EVERY SPORTSMAN OUGHT TO KNOW ABOUT. STAY ENGAGED!

7 mins read
Bear Hunting Magazine
January - February 2021

SPRING HUNTING IN MAINE

In 1982 Maine closed its spring season, but you can still spring hunt with an outfitter on some tribal lands.

3 mins read
Bear Hunting Magazine
January - February 2021

Bears & Gobblers

SPRING BEAR & TURKEY IN MONTANA

9 mins read
Bear Hunting Magazine
January - February 2021

Western Bear Hunting

Picking the right outfitter - Picking the right outfitter can make or break your experience.

6 mins read
Bear Hunting Magazine
January - February 2021

Three Phases of the Spring

Understanding the Pros & Cons in the Timing of Spring Bear Hunting

8 mins read
Bear Hunting Magazine
January - February 2021

Extreme Utility

Jeff Senger kills for a living.

7 mins read
Bear Hunting Magazine
January - February 2021

Canning - Bear Meat

The last six months my non-hunting friends asking increasingly specific questions about how to turn animals into meat.

6 mins read
Bear Hunting Magazine
January - February 2021

Bear Dogs - East vs West

The term “bear dog” means something different to every houndsman.

8 mins read
Bear Hunting Magazine
January - February 2021

Alaska - One Last Grizzly (DIY)

NOTHING LASTS FOREVER, BUT THE AUTHOR HAS HAD A HECK OF A RUN ON ARCTIC GRIZZLY

10+ mins read
Bear Hunting Magazine
January - February 2021

Understanding Skull Size in Evaluating Trophy Black Bear

Black bears can be one of the most difficult big game animals to judge before the shot.

7 mins read
Bear Hunting Magazine
November - December 2020