Jeanneau what I mean?
Sailing Today|July 2021
French manufacturer Jeanneau is back with an all new 60’ cruiser that offers a beguiling blend of comfort and performance
Sam Jefferson

Cast your mind back to 2014 if you dare. Yes, I know it seems like a halcyon time when it wasn’t illegal to go abroad for example but there it is. It was in this year that Jeanneau launched their flagship yacht, the 64. I tested one and, although impressed by many features of the yacht, I was left wondering if the company hadn’t perhaps lost the plot just a little bit. I just wondered who on earth wanted a 64’ production yacht. 72 yachts later and the answer is quite a few people did and the 64 is lauded as one of the big successes of the company in recent times. It led to the rest of the big production boatbuilders (Hanse, Bavaria, Beneteau, Dufour) following suit and the idea of a ‘mini superyacht’ was born. Don’t call me Nostradamus.

The rationale is simple and also completely correct. In recent years the addition of bow and stern thrusters has taken away the fear factor in parking a 60’ yacht. You no longer need the reassuring presence of a full time skipper to coax such a yacht into a narrow berth, you can largely spin it on the spot. It’s an absolute game changer. Add into the mix improvements in sail handling systems, improved in-mast furling sail shape and the widespread adoption of electric winches and you suddenly have the ability to make a 60’ yacht a real and undaunting proposition for a cruising couple. Because, ultimately, that remains the target market for the Jeanneau 60.

So what have we got here? Well, this is a boat that rounds off the Jeanneau Yachts linenicely. This line starts with the Jeanneau 51 and concludes with the 64 (soon to be relaunched as the 65 incidentally). As such, Jeanneau has stuck with the tried and tested team of Phillippe Briand drawing up the lines and Andrew Winch doing the interiors. Winch is a bit of a specialist in superyachts so you can see where Jeanneau are coming from here. The lines are relatively conservative with beam kept at what these days would be considered a fairly modest 17’ and a bit of taper carried aft. Freeboard is decent but not obscene with a subtle chine running aft from midships. The coachroof is nicely integrated giving the boat a sleek look on the water. There is a hint of a dreadnought bow with a sprit for the Code 0 and the anchor combined. The transom is not completely vertical but features a slight rake. Below the waterline there is an L – Shaped cast iron keel available in two depths (2.55m or 2.1m) and twin rudders. The boat weighs in at 20,000kg so it’s no lightweight flier but it is approximately 2,000kg lighter than the slightly smaller Hanse 588. There are two rig options available, both deck stepped, with the sportier one offering 163m2 and a fully battened main. The standard rig offers 131m2 with a self tacking jib and in mast furling. The key question with yachts in this size range is whether the manufacturer goes for a dinghy garage in the transom and Jeanneau has opted to do this. As such, the yacht accommodates a full size dinghy with outboard to be discreetly tucked away behind the bathing platform.

On deck

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