Osher GÜNSBERG: The pursuit of happiness
The Australian Women's Weekly|April 2020
He’s the king of reality romance, helping lovelorn singles on their path to find true love. But, Osher Günsberg tells Tiffany Dunk, his own happily ever after didn’t come without a price.
Tiffany Dunk

There’s a very special guest at our photo shoot with Osher Günsberg. She’s the woman he credits with bringing him a sense of completion and joy he’d never dreamt of – a wonderful marriage, his stepdaughter Georgia, and newborn son Wolfgang, or Wolfie, as he’s affectionately nicknamed. She’s the woman who delivered him the happily ever after that he himself has been tasked with helping contestants on The Bachelor find since being appointed host in 2013.

That woman is his hair and makeup artist and long-time friend Carla Mico, or Cupid, as Osher jokes she likes to be called now. The pair have worked together regularly since the late 1990s when Osher – then going by Andrew G – was a music presenter on Channel [V]. However, when the 2014 series of The Bachelor was due to start filming, Carla was booked on another job. Don’t worry, she told Osher, she had found the perfect person to step in. “She’s lovely, she has a kid and you’re welcome,” Carla said to her friend – who had been busy bemoaning his single status – with a wink.

And so Audrey Griffen entered his world, a meeting that would change Osher’s life irrevocably and for which, he once again tells Carla, he’s “incredibly grateful”.

“Well, I did want Wolfie to be named after me,” she laughs of her bragging rights for this fateful introduction.

“Yes, she kept saying, ‘Carlos is a great name,’” Osher, 45, returns with a laugh of his own.

The popular TV host is clearly head over heels, not only with his wife but with their children. The foursome is that picture-perfect representation of the love that singles signing up to his reality dating franchise aspire to. They are demonstrative in their affections, frank in their discussions and four-month-old baby Wolfie is clearly the apple of everyone’s eye – not least Georgia, 16, who is happily cooing at her little brother as he twinkles back at her. She adores her new sibling and in turn Wolfie, Osher says, “smiles for her like for no one else. He lights up when he sees her. She’s the best sister.”

But for all these scenes of domestic bliss, Audrey and Osher’s first meeting on set was inauspicious.

“She saw me as I naturally appear in the wild,” he recalls now. “Arriving sweaty and nervous and on the back of a bicycle. There I was covered in dayglow and sweat, and there was Audrey Griffen looking at me with her Disney Princess eyes. And as I said hello to her, she poured a cup of coffee into her purse. We were both on our best form.”

For her part, all Audrey, 39, knew of the man who would soon become her husband was that he was that “kind of loud TV persona from Australian Idol”. But that perception we met.” changed very quickly. “My first impression was that he was surprisingly smart,” Audrey says. “Deep thinking and knowledgeable about the most random things. And I was surprised how much I liked conversing with him; I was surprised because I wasn’t expecting that level of conversation.”

Osher was equally struck but careful to keep things on a professional level at work. So professional, Audrey laughs, that on their first date she turned up with a friend, so clueless was she of his romantic interest in her.

“I actually thought, ‘These guys would make a great couple’,” she says. “I was like, ‘Do you like blondes? Because she’s single and lovely.’”

“I said, ‘I’m not interested in your friend,’” Osher recalls. “And Audrey said, ‘Well, I wish you’d told me because I would have showered – I’ve come straight from work!”

The relationship developed swiftly, although both say they were a little “in denial” about their future. At the time, Osher was still based in Los Angeles while single-mum Audrey’s life was very much in Sydney.

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