The Fourth Pyramid Of Giza
Wanderlust Travel Magazine|February 2020
We get a sneak peak at 2020’s most anticipated opening: the Grand Egyptian Museum in Giza – the world’s largest archaeological museum
Damien Gabet

“This will be the biggest museum dedicated to a single civilisation anywhere in the world.”

My ebullient guide, Egyptologist Yomna Salama, proudly ran through a set of impressive stats as we cleared security into the Grand Egyptian Museum’s Conservation Centre, winding though long, strip-lit corridors with shiny floors. There were guards everywhere, but if the place had the hallmarks of a maximum-security bunker it was for good reason. There are 19 laboratories here dedicated to the restoration and conservation of thousands of Egypt’s most precious antiquities.

They’re being brought back to best ahead of going on display in the museum itself, which is scheduled to open in October 2020. While its foundation stone was laid in 2002, the Arab Spring put the brakes on things. But with Cairo finding its feet again, workers are here around the clock. When it opens, the $1bn, 500,000 sq m megastructure – ‘The Fourth Pyramid of Giza’ – will display 50,000 artefacts, with thousands more in rotation. In the unlikely event that visitors get bored of looking at the greatest collection of Ancient Egyptian exhibits ever assembled, they can check out the view instead: the Grand Egyptian Museum (GEM) will overlook the wonders of the Giza Plateau, including the Great Pyramids.

Until then, limited pre-opening tours have been giving sneak previews ahead of the grand opening. The guests got to see the exhibits as they were being worked on; the closest anyone without a PhD in Egyptology will get to the likes of a 2,500-year-old Greco-Roman amphora with wine still in it – among other things. I was one of the lucky few to find myself behind that security line, to see what awaits visitors in October.

Ancient relics

The first of my three stop-offs was in the Stone Lab. Before me, a colourful set of reliefs depicted the story of heretic King Akhenaten, who introduced monotheism (the belief that there is only one God) to Egypt in an attempt to wrest power from the religious elite. The inbred, malarial, alien-headed Akhenaten was the first pharaoh to use religion for his political gains. When he died, aggrieved priests of the old order hid this limestone propaganda between the outer walls of a vast temple gateway near Aswan in ​Upper (Southern) Egypt, thus preserving it for us to enjoy some 3,000 years later.

It was then onto a set of enchanting murals, whose story betrayed the ancients’ penchant for pleasure. “Look at these high officials, they were party people!” declared Yomna, as she pointed to musicians playing the flute, harp and clarinet. Indeed, the fun folks of the Fifth Dynasty (2450- 2300 BC) enjoyed a calendar of more than 100 parties and celebrations.

Continue reading your story on the app

Continue reading your story in the magazine

MORE STORIES FROM WANDERLUST TRAVEL MAGAZINEView All

The Winners Return...

The Wanderlust Travel Photo of the Year 2019 prize winners have returned from their commission to Hong Kong and Macao. Here's what they found...

7 mins read
Wanderlust Travel Magazine
February/March 2022 Issue 219

Travel Trends 2022

Wondering what travel will look like in the year ahead? We look into our crystal ball and see what's hot for 2022

2 mins read
Wanderlust Travel Magazine
February/March 2022 Issue 219

Moon Rise over the Mississippi

The Mississippi River offers so much more than paddle steamer cruises and antebellum history. We take a greener, more intimate journey to experience 'Old Muddy's' wild places and Paleo-Indian history

10+ mins read
Wanderlust Travel Magazine
February/March 2022 Issue 219

Vietnam's Heritage Express

Connecting north with south, the Reunification Express is also perhaps the best way to visit Vietnam's UNESCO-listed sites and depth of culture

10+ mins read
Wanderlust Travel Magazine
February/March 2022 Issue 219

Nepal's Diverse Dishes

Nepali cooking is shaped by its unique geography. In this edited extract from his book Ayla, chef Santosh Shah gives us an insight into the rich cuisine of his home country

3 mins read
Wanderlust Travel Magazine
February/March 2022 Issue 219

5 Crafts to Try and Buy in Austria

A country's crafts reveal its culture, so return home with a cowbell or snowglobe to remind you of Austria's Alpine meadows

2 mins read
Wanderlust Travel Magazine
February/March 2022 Issue 219

Gallic Hug

With its layers of history, seductive light, warm welcome and strong traditions, Northern France's timeless coastline calls out to be discovered

10+ mins read
Wanderlust Travel Magazine
February/March 2022 Issue 219

Hidden Massachusetts

Small but dense with local - and national - interest, the East Coast state is rich with Founding Fathers' history, classy modern culture and spools of serene nature beyond the ever-popular leaf-peeping trails

6 mins read
Wanderlust Travel Magazine
February/March 2022 Issue 219

22 FOR '22 WEIRD & WONDERFUL WILDLIFE TO SEE THIS YEAR

Discover the world's strangest creatures - and where you can find them

10+ mins read
Wanderlust Travel Magazine
February/March 2022 Issue 219

Lord Howe Island

There’s something rather special about Australia’s wild, tiny, far-flung Tasman Sea isle, reckons Ayan Adak

3 mins read
Wanderlust Travel Magazine
January 2022 / Issue 218