Lesser Known PYRAMIDS from the Mayan Civilisation
Touriosity Travelmag|September 2020
The Mayan civilisation was a Mesoamerican civilisation that grew up in the tropical lowlands of today’s Guatemala and ultimately reached the countries of Belize and parts of Mexico, Honduras and El Salvador. It spread across the timeline of 2000 BC to 900 AD, reaching the peak of its power in the sixth century AD when the Maya population is said to have reached a strength of 20,00,000.

The Mayans are known for their highly developed hieroglyphic script, art, architecture, calendar, mathematics and astronomy. Amongst their other contributions are the beautiful stone cities and monuments built by them that have fascinated historians, explorers and archaeologists alike.

While most of the ancient civilisations grew up in dry climates with a centralised water-body that provided water for irrigation, the Mayans were an exception in this regard. Their civilisation developed in a tropical rainforest and they had abundant water although not necessarily a water-body.

The earliest Maya people were agriculturists and grew crops like maize, beans, squash and cassava. In the mountainous highlands, they practiced a primitive type of slash-and-burn agriculture, but there were farmers who also used more advanced methods, like terrace cultivation, with irrigation facilities. In the swampy lowlands they would build platforms with raised earth to grow crops and surround it with canals.

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