LOST SPRING, Autumn Sonata
Outlook Traveller|November 2020
A nip in the air, familiar scents and a walk through Delhi’s green lung was the much needed escape.
PRANNAY PATHAK

I AMBLE GINGERLY on the paved walkway leading up to the Sunder Burj, my pace losing its morning vigour with every passing second as I undergo a quiet hypnotism impressed upon me by the bridelike majesty of the structure. The spell is momentarily broken when the scent of autumn, diffused in the air by the flowers crushed under passing feet, meets with my sense of smell. This is despite the restrictive grasp of the mask on my face that the times have necessitated. But it is a cloth mask, cotton, to be precise, and is coordinated nicely with the setting on account of the little blue flowers, so who’s complaining?

Yes, with a pandemic raging, we have decided, after much haunt-hunting, to hand ourselves to Sunder Nursery on an overcast Delhi morning. I remember stepping out of home like a baby that first learns to walk and into the Uber rather circumspectly like I had never learned to entrust myself to a vehicle. In the space of the half-hour it took us to reach here, we sanitised our hands twice, not afraid of setting our palms on fire in the Delhi sun, whose wicked nature even the virus doesn’t seem to have softened after all.

Anyway, all the hassle seems to be paying off. Deprived of travel and free mingling with the great outdoors, this 90-acre arboretum speckled with 15 heritage monuments (six of them Unesco World Heritage Sites) already seems to have upstaged the Garden of Eden itself in my imagination.

Built-in the 16th century, the freshly restored Sunder Burj hides behind its extraordinary stature a channel for water to flow in, interspersed by fountains and rivulets complemented sublimely by flowerbeds. The benches here provide stimulating angles to view the supreme architecture of the titular structure of the park. We even spend a good half-hour climbing up to the platform and venturing inside, stocking up to feed our hungry Instagrams when another pandemic strikes.

The end of the water channel diverges into two circuits. Being modern humans, we haven’t got Robert Frost’s individualism so we take the road presumably more travelled by. Thankfully, the area plan is such that you have to be really special to miss a lot. And it leads towards a waterbody whose exotic composure is accentuated with each passing second by the approaching cloud cover. The opposite bank overhangs with dramatic laburnum and a couple of women softly discuss politics under it. It is an artificial lake, we learn by ourselves somehow, and loutishly hog a bench with quaint armrests to fully soak in the foreign country feel that we prize so much here. I remember muttering to myself: “No, don’t say yeh toh India ka Scotland hai.”

Continue reading your story on the app

Continue reading your story in the magazine

MORE STORIES FROM OUTLOOK TRAVELLERView All

MERRY GENTS OF BINSAR

Lockdown blues? PRANNAY PATHAK finds his melting away in the sweet wintering pastures of Kumaon.

9 mins read
Outlook Traveller
January 2021

ON THE wings OF FREEDOM

For the first time in my life, I had an understanding of the naturalist’s drive that I had seen only in birdwatchers.

8 mins read
Outlook Traveller
January 2021

Meet The General Manager ARMANI HOTEL DUBAI'S THOMAS PERUZZO

With a Danish and Italian lineage, he’s recently moved from Germany, where he was raised and upheld many senior management positions for several brands

2 mins read
Outlook Traveller
January 2021

NITIN CHAUDHARY Digging Where I Stand

They say that travelling is a great way to learn. However, we have inherently associated travelling with travelling far. But that need not be so, as I discovered this year. I was forced to reduce my range but I still found hidden local gems

2 mins read
Outlook Traveller
January 2021

Bhujangasana: Cobra pose

A back bending pose which is also part of the traditional surya namaskar sequence, bhujangasana reflects the posture of a cobra that has its hood raised. Considered one of the most powerful asanas, it can help reduce belly fat. While during the initial stages, the practitioner is simply trying to build his/her physical capacity, with time, one starts visualising and imitating a cobra including the sound of its breath.

2 mins read
Outlook Traveller
January 2021

Mutton Rogan Josh

It is an authentic recipe straight from the Kashmiri kitchen, distinguished by its red sauce

2 mins read
Outlook Traveller
January 2021

Feral Dreams: Mowgli & His Mothers

By STEPHEN ALTER ALEPH BOOK COMPANY

2 mins read
Outlook Traveller
January 2021

Colaba's Eerie But Always Interesting Past

Shabnam Minwalla provides a riveting glimpse into Colaba’s eerie but always interesting past.

9 mins read
Outlook Traveller
January 2021

The Muslims You Don't See

If Muslims are outsiders in Europe, why do so many expats love their countries? Roland Mascarenhas shares some answers

7 mins read
Outlook Traveller
January 2021

Beginning 2021 On A Note Of Hope

As the world inches closer to renewing the normal ways of our existence, Ameya Bundellu gazes into the crystal ball and tells us what travel in 2021 will look like

6 mins read
Outlook Traveller
January 2021