DUBLIN
National Geographic Traveller (UK)|June 2021
From grande dames and Georgian townhouses to street art-inspired boutiques and self-catering gems, the Irish capital’s eclectic hotel scene is more exciting than ever before.

Dublin is every bit as hard to define as the dialects on its streets and the craic in its pubs. Even lingering visits leave you feeling like you’ve barely scratched the surface of a capital that transports you from Georgian terraces to glossy new builds in the turn of a corner. Beyond the city’s walkable core, cradled by canals, urban villages like Ranelagh and Rathmines are blossoming, while Phibsborough, Stoneybatter and the Liberties deftly juggle age-old communities and the creep of gentrification. The mash-up of past and present is also reflected in the city’s accommodation options, which have taken a quantum leap forward in recent years, thanks to a wave of chic new stays and investment in stalwarts. Increasingly, Dublin’s hotels are where you’ll find some of its best cocktail bars and rooftop hangouts, too. As the city reboots and doors open, travellers can expect to feel a scintillating sense of making up for lost time.

Best for cinephiles

THE DEVLIN

Hotels can be hit and miss in Dublin’s urban villages, and this Ranelagh retreat is firmly in the former camp. Its modernist cream exterior stands out amid the redbrick surrounds, while inside it’s crammed with edgy Irish art and compact rooms (from dinky ModPods to slightly larger TriPods). Nifty in-room touches like mini Marshall amp speakers and Munchie Boxes (stocked with Irish produce) make the most of the limited space. Best of all, there’s also a basement cinema, a luxe hideaway where you can order up snacks and cocktails to lamplit, mid-century-style armchairs, before ascending to Layla’s rooftop bar.

ROOMS: Doubles from €159 (£138), room only. thedevlin.ie

Best for romantic getaways

DYLAN

Stashed away on a side street near the Aviva Stadium, Dylan is a secluded bolthole where your drink clinks on a pewter bar, bold art stops you in the hall (check out that Ana Fuentes triptych) and a pre-dinner knock on the door brings a cocktail trolley and bartender. ‘Experience’ suites are the pick of the rooms, and a pair of restaurant terraces (The Eddison and The Nurserie) chime with our new age of the outdoors. Dishes here are served with a twist, and might include an autumn salad with wild rice, radicchio, golden beetroot, pumpkin and dark chocolate pesto.

ROOMS: Doubles from €209 (£181), room only. dylan.ie

Best for Generation X

THE HENDRICK SMITHFIELD

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