DENIS VILLENEUVE'S DREAMS OF ‘DUNE' REACH THE BIG SCREEN
Techlife News|Techlife News #521
It was the eyes that drew Denis Villeneuve to “Dune.”

Long before he’d decided to become a filmmaker, he was just a teenager browsing a bookstore when he spotted the cover of Frank Herbert’s 1965 novel. But it wasn’t a hard sell for the biology-obsessed 14-year-old who had already learned that science fiction was a way to dream on a grand scale.

Then he read it and was mesmerized by the poetic, atmospheric story of a young man’s heroic journey that dealt with religion, politics, destiny, heritage, the environment, colonialism, and giant space worms.

“It became an obsession,” Villeneuve, 54, said.

And it was just the beginning of a decade-spanning dream that is finally coming to fruition as his own version of “Dune” makes its way to North American theaters.

Villeneuve is not the first filmmaker who has dared to fantasize about making “Dune,” but he’s the first to see his vision realized in a way that might satisfy both fans and novices. For a book that has inspired so much science fiction over the past 50 years, from “Star Wars” to “Alien,” filmed adaptations have proved difficult. First, there was Alejandro Jodorowsky’s near-mythic movie slash 14-hour event that would have starred Mick Jagger, Orson Welles, Gloria Swanson, and Salvador Dalí (chronicled in the 2013 documentary “Jodorowsky’s Dune”). Then David Lynch’s swing was a critical and commercial flop when it was released in 1984.

“Dune” seemed cursed until producers Mary Parent and Cale Boyter acquired the rights through Legendary and found out that Villeneuve, who had established himself as a filmmaker with that rare ability to make large-scale films that are cerebral and commercially viable, was a lifelong fan. Plans were set in motion to try to make “Dune” once more — with a $165 million production budget.

“My movie is not an act of arrogance,” Villeneuve said. “It’s an act of humility. My dream was that a hardcore fan of ‘Dune’ would feel that I put a camera in their mind.”

The book was his bible and compass throughout the process. He kept it close on set so that the spirit of it was always nearby and encouraged his crew and cast to read it closely as well.

Continue reading your story on the app

Continue reading your story in the magazine

MORE STORIES FROM TECHLIFE NEWSView All

JAPAN'S MITSUBISHI, ENERGY BODY JOIN GATES' NUCLEAR PROJECT

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries and the Japan Atomic Energy Agency have signed an agreement to participate in a next-generation nuclear energy project with TerraPower, a company started by Bill Gates.

1 min read
Techlife News
Techlife News #535

SAMSUNG REPORTS ROBUST PROFIT BASED ON CHIP STRENGTH

Samsung Electronics Co. said Thursday its operating profit for the last quarter rose by more than 53% from the same period last year as it continued to thrive during the pandemic while relying on its dual strength in parts and finished products.

1 min read
Techlife News
Techlife News #535

PICASSO HEIRS LAUNCH DIGITAL ART PIECE TO RIDE ‘CRYPTO' WAVE

Pablo, meet Crypto. Heirs of Pablo Picasso, the famed 20th-century Spanish artist, are vaulting into 21st-century commerce by selling 1,010 digital art pieces of one of his ceramic works that has never before been seen publicly — riding a fad for “crypto” assets that have taken the art and financial worlds by storm.

3 mins read
Techlife News
Techlife News #535

NORTH CAROLINA CHOSEN FOR SUPERSONIC PASSENGER JET PLANT

A Colorado-based aviation company announced this week that it has chosen a North Carolina airport as the manufacturing site for next-generation supersonic passenger jets.

3 mins read
Techlife News
Techlife News #535

HOT STUFF: LAB HITS MILESTONE ON LONG ROAD TO FUSION POWER

With 192 lasers and temperatures more than three times hotter than the center of the sun, scientists hit — at least for a fraction of a second — a key milestone on the long road toward nearly pollution-free fusion energy.

3 mins read
Techlife News
Techlife News #535

DC, 3 STATES SUE GOOGLE SAYING IT INVADES USERS' PRIVACY

The District of Columbia and three states are suing Google for allegedly deceiving consumers and invading their privacy by making it nearly impossible for them to stop their location from being tracked.

3 mins read
Techlife News
Techlife News #535

TESLA POSTS RECORD PROFIT, WON'T PRODUCE NEW MODELS IN 2022

Tesla Inc. on Wednesday posted record fourth-quarter and full-year earnings as deliveries of its electric vehicles soared despite a global shortage of computer chips that has slowed the entire auto industry.

3 mins read
Techlife News
Techlife News #535

‘SOLD BY AMAZON' PROGRAM ENDS FOLLOWING STATE INVESTIGATION

Amazon will end its “Sold by Amazon” program after an investigation by Washington state’s attorney general found it was anticompetitive and violated antitrust laws, according to court documents filed this week.

1 min read
Techlife News
Techlife News #535

Q&A: INTERNET GUARDIAN RON DEIBERT OF CITIZEN LAB

The internet watchdog Citizen Lab has been remarkably effective in calling to account governments and private sector firms that use information technology to put people in peril.

3 mins read
Techlife News
Techlife News #535

UK'S BENTLEY POURING BILLIONS INTO ELECTRIC CAR OVERHAUL

Luxury automaker Bentley said this week it is pouring billions into upgrading manufacturing to accelerate its electric vehicle development plan, joining other auto brands shifting away from gasoline engines.

1 min read
Techlife News
Techlife News #535