Covid-19: Why Are So Many Bame Patients Dying From The Disease?
BBC Focus - Science & Technology|Summer 2020
Black, Asian and minority ethnic groups are dying from COVID-19 at disproportionate rates. What’s the story behind the statistics?
Juanita Bawagan
The COVID-19 pandemic has had a global impact, but its effects have hit some groups harder than others.

In the United Kingdom, more than 40,000 people have so far died from COVID-19, with people from black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) communities disproportionately affected.

A report published on 19 June by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) found that black men are more than three times as likely to die from COVID-19 than white men, while black women are almost 2.5 times as likely to die than white women. People of Bangladeshi, Pakistani and Indian ethnicity are also significantly more likely to die from COVID-19 than white people.

A Public Health England report published on 2 June found that people from BAME backgrounds are also more likely to become infected with the coronavirus in the first place. For example, black ethnic groups are around two to three times more likely to be diagnosed with COVID-19 than white groups.

Similar patterns have been recorded within BAME communities in the US, particularly among African Americans.

“The pandemic has really exposed the vulnerability of certain communities because of the way in which people live and the way in which societies engage,” says Dr Clyde Yancy, professor of cardiology and medical social sciences at Northwestern University, in the US.

Continue reading your story on the app

Continue reading your story in the magazine

MORE STORIES FROM BBC FOCUS - SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGYView All

Omicron Variant: How Worried Should We Be About It?

Research has started to emerge on the latest variant of COVID. How concerned should we be about it, and what makes it different from previous variants?

5 mins read
BBC Science Focus
January 2022

HAVANA SYNDROME: WHAT'S CAUSING THE MYSTERIOUS ILLNESS?

Some have blamed top-secret weapons, but the condition could be all in the mind

4 mins read
BBC Science Focus
January 2022

Dinosaur treasure trove unearthed in Italy

PALAEONTOLOGY

1 min read
BBC Science Focus
January 2022

AN END TO AGEING?

Eternal youth is the stuff of religion and mythology, but what if we could just have a bit more of it? What if there was a pill that could slow down the ravages of time, so that you could feel younger for longer. It sounds like snake oil, but there’s a growing body of research that’s betting on making it a reality

9 mins read
BBC Science Focus
January 2022

ANIMAL EMISSIONS: HOW BIG IS MY PET'S CARBON PAWPRINT AND WHAT CAN I DO TO MINIMISE IT?

Globally, pets chomp their way through about 20 per cent of the planet’s meat and fish. Could Fido and Mr Tibbles adopt a more carbon-friendly lifestyle?

4 mins read
BBC Science Focus
January 2022

ASTRONOMY: NASA'S SOLAR PROBE ‘TOUCHES' THE SUN

The Parker Solar Probe is part of the way through its seven-year mission to investigate the inner workings of our nearest star

3 mins read
BBC Science Focus
January 2022

A WINNING FORMULA

Beneath the rainforests of South America lives a fungi that consumes 50,000 leaves a day without ever coming to the surface. It relies on ants to bring it food in exchange for nutrients. This unlikely partnership starred in Sir David Attenborough’s new wildlife series The Green Planet. Evolutionary biologist Dr Pepijn Kooij speaks to Amy Barrett about this special relationship…

8 mins read
BBC Science Focus
January 2022

THE LIGHT FANTASTIC

As new telescopes around the world power up, they could answer an ancient mystery: what’s powering the most energetic explosions in the Universe?

10 mins read
BBC Science Focus
January 2022

Why do we find human like androids so unsettling?

Alex Hughes spoke to the creator of Ameca, a humanoid robot that’s been going viral online for its uncanny facial expressions

4 mins read
BBC Science Focus
January 2022

WELCOME TO YOUR FUTURE COMMUTE

JUST A FEW YEARS AGO, IT FELT LIKE FLYING CARS WERE STILL A DISTANT SCI-FI FUTURE WE COULD ONLY DREAM ABOUT. BUT INVESTMENT HAS INCREASED RAPIDLY, AND A NUMBER OF COMPANIES ARE NOW BUILDING AIR TAXIS TO MAKE OUR CITY JOURNEYS FASTER, EASIER AND CLEANER

6 mins read
BBC Science Focus
January 2022