Gear Up!
Official PlayStation Magazine - UK Edition|April 2020
Guilty Gear creator Daisuke Ishiwatari talks to Oscar Taylor- Kent about taking fighting games back to the dojo with Strive
For fighting game fans, Arc System Works needs no introduction. Its core series, Guilty Gear and Blazblue (which started on PS1 and PS3 respectively), have dominated fighting game tournaments like EVO for years now. On top of that the studio’s produced some impressive franchise-led efforts in the shapes of Persona 4 Arena, Dragon Ball FighterZ, and Granblue Fantasy Versus. Now with Guilty Gear Strive (the “iv” in the title is meant to denote the fourth true iteration of the series) the fighting game studio is taking the genre right back to the drawing board.

“THE FIGHTING GAME GENRE […] DEMANDS A HIGH LEVEL OF TECHNIQUE

“Over Guilty Gear’s 20-year history, the focus was to make each update more exciting and impactful than the last,” says Daisuke Ishiwatari, the series’ creator and chief creative officer on Guilty Gear Strive. “We tried to tone it down somewhat with Guilty Gear Xrd, but it didn’t address the main issue with the series – the gap in ability between veteran players and those new to the franchise.”

Arc’s games are known for being fast-paced and technical, with a high skill ceiling, all bright lights and clashing colours that require twitchy reflexes to master. But over the years it’s been working to make fighters friendlier by including more in-depth tutorials and new modes that assist with combos without taking away too much control.

“The fighting game genre is competitive by nature and demands a high level of technique and execution of players, so there should be a clear difference between strong players and those just starting out,” says Ishiwatari on the difficulty of balancing the two sides of the spectrum. “The problem was that the ability gap between series veterans and beginners was still too large, even though Guilty Gear Xrd was intended to be a brand-new title. [One thing] we are doing now is taking a hard look at a number of things in order to establish a new baseline for long-time players and newcomers to start from.”

PUTTING ON A SHOW

With Strive, Guilty Gear is undergoing a big mechanical overhaul to address its complex nature. “The goal is not to simplify complex mechanics or make the game easier. To excel, players will still need to develop advanced skills and an in-depth understanding of the game,” says Ishiwatari. “Our games have the reputation of being hard to understand from the very beginning.” From the demo that’s been showcased at a few fighting game tournaments, it’s clear that while a lot of changes have been made, characters still have many of the moves you’ll be used to.

Continue reading your story on the app

Continue reading your story in the magazine

RELATED STORIES

ROBOT ARTIST SELLS ART FOR $688,888, NOW EYEING MUSIC CAREER

Sophia is a robot of many talents — she speaks, jokes, sings and even makes art. In March, she caused a stir in the art world when a digital work she created as part of a collaboration was sold at an auction for $688,888 in the form of a nonfungible token (NFT).

2 mins read
AppleMagazine
April 09, 2021

AirVPN: Excellent service that power users will love

An excellent service with a known history, a solid network, and very good speeds.

7 mins read
Macworld
April 2021

A SMALL PEARL ON LAKE COMO | MONTE SAN PRIMO

In 2019 I was working on an art project in Bellagio, Italy. This small pearl on Lake Como is dominated by a mountain called Monte San Primo.

2 mins read
Lens Magazine
February 2021

Let's Get Physical

Having long marveled at the technology of the high-end workout equipment on the high seas, Porthole goes all in on putting together a home fitness center.

3 mins read
Porthole Cruise Magazine
March/April 2021

The Hierarchy of Tragedy

In this British series about the AIDS crisis, doom confers importance.

6 mins read
New York magazine
March 1-14, 2021

FREAKED-OUT CRUISE TAKES CONTROL!

Gets COVID-proof movie set after wild virus rant

1 min read
Globe
January 25, 2021

SAVING LITTLE ITALY

THE ICONIC ETHNIC NEIGHBORHOOD HAS OUTLASTED ALL OF BALTIMORE’S OLD-WORLD ENCLAVES. NOW IT FACES ITS GREATEST CHALLENGE IN MORE THAN A CENTURY.

10+ mins read
Baltimore magazine
January 2021

Classic Upland Guns

Baker Gun and Forging Company: Batavia Leader

3 mins read
The Upland Almanac
Spring 2021

California Coastal Road Trip

Like many people around the country, we have had little occasion to travel this year. With car shows and events like the Power Tour and Drag Week postponed and rescheduled due to the coronavirus, we’ve mostly been stuck at home. I recently had occasion to travel to Santa Rosa, California, for a photo shoot with Scott Birdsall, owner/builder of Old Smokey, the Cummins-powered Ford F1 that beat the diesel-engine record at the Pikes Peak International Hillclimb. Motor Trend’s William Walker was the shooter, with me serving as assistant and camera car driver. It seemed like as good excuse as any to make a trip out of it.

2 mins read
Hot Rod
February 2021

LITTLE ITALY

The lesser-known northeastern region of Friuli Venezia Giulia boasts unspoiled vistas and sail-friendly waters

6 mins read
Business Traveler
December 2020/January 2021