Spider-Man: Miles Morales - Representation At Its Fullest
GameOn Magazine|Issue 137 - March 2021
Kasey explains the importance of representation, and how Spider-Man gets it right.
Kasey B Burgess

PlayStation has released unbelievable titles in the past few years, like God of War and The Last of Us Part II. Fans of games and comic books alike were all excited when PlayStation had their hands on Marvel’s SpiderMan. The game proved itself to be one of the best games of 2018 and left many wanting more. With Miles playing an intricate part in the first game, it was only a matter of time before PlayStation would keep quiet on the next installment. While seen from a mile away, it was welcomed nonetheless when Miles Morales swung his way into the gaming verse. Marvel’s Spider-Man: Miles Morales is more than just another SpiderMan game; it is the opportunity for players to be superheroes through a different lens.

Origins of Miles Morales

Miles Morales’ origin is historical and creative, taking the risk of introducing a new character to the Spider-verse. Spider-Man’s conception was always one of relatability that one could easily see themselves donning the costume. Many relate to Peter Parker’s life of being a young high-schooler who doesn’t think they could ever leave their mark on the world. For decades, Peter Parker, as Spider-Man, was someone many kids read and watched, believing that they too could help those around them even without the spider powers. That they also could be superheroes. Despite Peter Parker inspiring so many young kids worldwide, it’s difficult to ignore that some could not fully see themselves as web-slingers.

Back in 2008, while at the precipice of America electing its first African-American President, writer Brian Michael Bendis and artist Sara Pichelli found that it was time to relook one of Marvel’s icons. Miles’ integration into the gaming world is significant because no longer does one get just to read or watch him, but you get to be him. It should not go unnoticed that people of color couldn’t wait to get their hands on this game. To be able to see someone of the same hue be Spider-Man.

As Miles Morales

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