GOING TO THE EXTREME
Lens Magazine|September 2021
An Exclusive Interview With Krystle Wright
Cata CROITORU
She is extremely dedicated. She is the one who is looking for that right moment to capture the unique and right shot. She traveled the whole Earth in pursuit of that unique magical image. Deserts and profundity of the oceans, deserted lands, or jagged mountains were her playgrounds. Sometimes she has been waiting four and a half years to snap that shot that has established her famous. And afterward that she moved away to another corner of the world to wait for another impressive shot. She is a nomad, and she is famous. Her home is her backpack, and it seems her religion is her camera. And her name is Krystle Wright...

Cata CROITORU: Hello Krystle, It's a pleasure to have this Interview. You are a well-known photographer. Deep divers, straight mountain wall climbers, flying parachutes over the salted desert - you beat them all. When the people want to see who the photographer behind a certain picture is, they discover you; you pictured sometimes covered in thick clothes, the head hooded and almost frozen, sometimes seen holding a dog in your arms, sometimes pictured with a swollen eye... But who exactly are you, Krystle?

Krystle Wright: I define myself as an artist and a nomadic soul traversing the globe as I allow my camera to be the excuse in how I engage with the world around me. What I strive for is to be educated, and that education for me comes in the form of conversing with a diverse range of people from all walks of life and challenging myself through practical scenarios that test me both mentally and physically. Undeniably, I have a stubborn nature that drives my curiosity to see how far I can take my art and photography.

Cata CROITORU: You always wanted to take pictures? Did you dream of something else when you will be a grown-up? How did everything start?

Krystle Wright: It started as a gamble after high school on pursuing a career as a photographer. I was lost in which direction to head, except knowing that I had to pursue something involving creativity and being outside. It was my mum who suggested photography as I loved taking a disposable Kodak camera on my camping trips, and in her opinion, I came back with good images. Without any other competing idea, I figured it was worth a gamble to enroll in a university degree for a Bachelor of Photography. And whilst I hated my time at university, it propelled me down this path and that I will be forever grateful for.

Cata CROITORU: When you talk about yourself as a person, you define yourself as an adventure photographer. What does it all really mean?

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