SIXTY SECONDS WITH...
Guitar Techniques|October 2021
A minute’s all it takes to discover what makes a great guitarist tick. Before he jumped into his limo for the Airport, we grabbed a quick chatwith Welsh blues slide guitarist and bandleader, Troy Redfern.
Troy Redfern.

GT: Do you have a type of pick that you can’t live without?

TR: I do! I exclusively use Dunlop Sharp 1.35mm picks, the dark grey ones. I’ve been using those picks for years now. I love the length of the drop on them, that point really helps my accuracy and I find them super comfortable with zero slippiness. I really find it hard to use regular shaped picks now, you get used to that sharp point, even though it’s only a couple of millimetres longer than a standard pick. I’ve got a heavy right hand so using the 1.35mm gives the pick an extra bit of longevity.

GT: If you had to give up all your pedals but three, what would they be?

TR: I’ve got quite a collection. They’ve all got their own personality and function so it’s hard to whittle it down two just three. My Hermida Distortion would be one, it’s such a versatile pedal and it’s been on pretty much every one of my albums. It’s got the Dumble thing going on, but it has a tonne more gain, and has sweet spots everywhere. Another pedal I’d keep would be my old Mutron Phasor II. To me it’s hands down the best sounding phaser ever made. It’s a bit on the large side, but it’s worth the real estate. I think it must be something to do with the photocells used from that era that gives it that extra sparkle. The last pedal would be my Ibanez DDL10 Delay II. It has its own personality and is such a great sounding delay. It’s been on my board for years.

GT: Do you play another instrument well enough to be in a band.

TR: I play bass, keys, drums, saz, banjo and drums. The saz is a Turkish seven-stringed instrument, with the strings divided up into courses on two, two and three, and the octave divided up with extra quarter tones. It’s got a really distinctive tone, very Eastern sounding. I’ve played bass once or twice live, but it’s mainly in the studio that I’ll play bass, I love locking with a groove. It’s the same with the drums. I’ve played every instrument on all the albums that I’ve released up until now but on my brand-new record, which was recorded at Rockfield Studios in Wales, I got the incredibly talented Darby Todd (The Darkness, Robben Ford, Paul Gilbert, Guthrie Govan) on drums.

GT: If a music chart were put in front of you, could you read it?

TR: I can read a basic chart, but if you’re talking complex jazz charts then that would take a bit of time. I usually write charts for my own songs, and if I’m touring and playing with guys for the first time I find it helps to send them charts too, along with audio versions of the songs.

GT: Do guitar cables really make a difference?

TR: I do. It’s a scientific fact that the longer your cable, the more capacitance gets added and the more noise you’ll get. This can lead to a drop off in treble. It’s not something that you’d want. I’ve used a lot of different makes over the years, like Planet Waves, but my go-to cables are the Mogami Gold Series. They’re fantastic, great build quality, and sound brilliant.

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