Wellness That Endures
Outside Magazine|September/October 2020
Strategies and tips to help you get through anything
BRAD STULBERG

IT HAS BEEN AN UNPRECEDENTED, challenging, and uncertain year for just about everyone. Which is why, perhaps now more than ever, cultivating resilience—the ability to bounce back after you’ve been knocked down—is essential. The first step: focusing on what you can control and trying not to waste energy on what you can’t. Fortunately, there are a handful of health and well-being practices that you can do to accomplish this goal. The following evidence-based strategies will help you build a solid, strong, and resilient body and mind.

Push-Ups

Begin with your chest down and palms pressing into the ground, thumbs at your nipples. Press up, locking your elbows at the top. Lower back down, so your chest gently touches the ground or hovers above it. Press up. Keep your core tight throughout the movement. For an easier option, place your hands on an elevated surface like a table or bench.

Kettlebell Swings

Stand with your feet slightly more than shoulder-width apart, holding a kettlebell by the horns. Pull your shoulder blades back and hinge at the hips so the kettlebell swings between your legs. Thrust your hips forward and swing the kettlebell in front of you to shoulder height.

Air Squats

Stand with your legs slightly wider than shoulder-width apart, feet pointing slightly out. Extend your arms out in front of you at shoulder height. Squat down, keeping heels on the ground and lowering your butt until it is at or just below your knees. Push up through both feet to stand, locking your knees at the top. For an extra challenge, hold a kettlebell at your chest.

Step-Ups

Place a bench or other sturdy object one foot in front of you. Step up, placing your entire right foot on the step. Push through your foot to bring your left foot up. Slowly step down with your right foot, then left foot. That counts as one rep. Do all reps on one side, then switch after resting for a few seconds.

No.1

Strength-Train at Home

IT’S POSSIBLE TO develop a great workout routine without stepping foot in a gym—all you need is a few feet of open space and a $35 kettlebell.

Research suggests that the best way to build muscle is an approach called progressive overload—stress a muscle, let it recover, and then stress it more, gradually building up the stress level over time. It’s important to keep this formula in mind. Too much stress with not enough rest and you get injury, illness, or burnout. Not enough stress with too much rest and you don’t get stronger. Being healthy and strong doesn’t require heavy doses of high-intensity interval training or running 50 miles per week. You just need to follow this cycle of stress and rest, increasing the load as you go.

Do this workout two to three times per week, completing three sets of between six and fifteen repetitions for each exercise, progressing in a circuit. Rest about one minute between exercises and two to three minutes between each circuit. Over time, gradually increase the number of reps or the weight of the kettlebell, or both. For an aerobic boost, add 30 to 60 seconds of running in place or jumping rope between sets. Be sure to rest at least one day between workouts to let your body recover.

No.2

Go for a Walk

A 2018 STUDY of over 50,000 people published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine found that regular, brisk walking was associated with a 20 percent reduction across all causes of death. While physical distancing is encouraged to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, most scientists agree that if you’re healthy and haven’t been recently exposed to the virus, the benefit of walking or running outdoors in uncrowded spaces outweighs the risk of transmission, especially if you avoid coming within six feet of other people. Want to increase the challenge? Find hilly terrain, carry a full backpack (aim for a weight that challenges you but doesn’t cause back pain during or after your walk), or, if you’re ready for it, mix in short bursts of running.

No. 3

Don’t Skimp on Carbs

Continue reading your story on the app

Continue reading your story in the magazine

MORE STORIES FROM OUTSIDE MAGAZINEView All

Wellness That Endures

Strategies and tips to help you get through anything

10 mins read
Outside Magazine
September/October 2020

The New Reality

AFTER A NEARLY TWO-DECADE HIATUS, ECO-CHALLENGE MAKES A COMEBACK ON AMAZON PRIME AT JUST THE RIGHT MOMENT

2 mins read
Outside Magazine
September/October 2020

Out There, Nobody Can Hear You Scream

Two years ago, LATRIA GRAHAM wrote about the challenges of being Black in the outdoors, and countless readers asked her for advice. She didn’t write back, because she had no idea what to say. In the aftermath of a revolutionary summer, she responds.

10+ mins read
Outside Magazine
September/October 2020

Mr.Freeze

Wim Hof became famous for submerging himself in frigid water with the calm of a Zen master, and his teachings about breathwork and the health benefits of cold plunges have attracted millions of followers. Our writer traveled to Iceland to chill with the man who made cold extremely hot.

10+ mins read
Outside Magazine
September/October 2020

Life Is a Highway

TOOLS TO HELP YOU SAVOR THE JOURNEY

2 mins read
Outside Magazine
September/October 2020

Enter Sandman

SLUMBER WELL IN CAMP, NO MATTER HOW FAR OFF THE BEATEN PATH YOU PARK

1 min read
Outside Magazine
September/October 2020

All Together Now

MARINE BIOLOGIST AYANA ELIZABETH JOHNSON BECAME A STAR IN THE ENVIRONMENTAL MOVEMENT BY DEFTLY COMMUNICATING WHAT FEW PEOPLE UNDERSTAND: THAT CLEANING UP THE PLANET REQUIRES A COMMITMENT TO SOCIAL JUSTICE

6 mins read
Outside Magazine
September/October 2020

In It for the Long Haul

GEAR THAT STANDS THE TEST OF TIME

1 min read
Outside Magazine
September/October 2020

Breaking the Waves

What has life under lockdown taught the greatest surfer on earth? That switching it up was exactly what he needed.

3 mins read
Outside Magazine
September/October 2020

#she hunts

A new school of social-media influencers are giving hunting a fresh and decidedly female face. Food writer RACHEL LEVIN joins two rising stars of“Instagram” in the Arizona backcountry to chase mule deer for her first photographs by Jen Judgetime. Can she stomach what it takes to be an omnivore?

10+ mins read
Outside Magazine
September/October 2020