Restoring Balance
Tatler Malaysia|January 2022
Our body has an incredible ability to heal and regenerate itself, but a myriad factors can block its recovery. We talk to healing practitioners who use the power of sound and elemental energy to bring harmony and balance within
Elizabeth Soong

THE HEALING ENERGY OF SOUND Sound healing dates back to ancient times. In Greece, music from a flute or harp was used in an attempt to treat physical ailments like gout and cure mental disorders. To relieve chronic pain and restore harmony in a patient’s body, Egyptians used sound energy by composing vowel chants and built chambers to amplify sound and evoke catharsis. Music therapy was offered to wounded soldiers in the Second World War.

Of all forms of energy, sound is one of the more powerful modalities. It’s because the vibration of sound is not only heard through our ears but also through every cell in our bodies. Scientist Itzhak Bentov explains in his book Stalking the Wild Pendulum that when a cell is stressed or diseased, its frequency changes and it starts vibrating discordantly. He hypothesises that when a strong harmonising rhythm is applied, the malfunctioning cell might start beating in tune again.

In her book Earth: Pleiadian Keys to the Living Library, Barbara Marciniak concurs, “Sounds that are harmonious activate the body and create healing.”

Previously seen as an alternative therapy, sound healing is increasingly becoming mainstream. Hospitals are even integrating it into their treatment programmes to treat hyperactive children or help older people with neurological problems retrieve their memory. In fact, for Dr Kulreet Chaudhary, a leading neurologist and neuroscientist who is also a practitioner of Ayurvedic medicine, she implements the use of sound therapy into the treatment of chronic neurological conditions like multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s and migraine headaches.

As someone who is a big advocate of conscious mindfulness, Datin Dian Lee, who’s a certified sound healing practitioner and heads the Luna Soul Care Club, sees this modality as a form of meditation to guide one into stillness. “People might not be comfortable by just sitting quietly with their breath. With sound, the mind has something to cling on to,” she explains. Our fast-paced lifestyle and our need to be stimulated all the time makes our mind go at hyperspeed and the only way to decompress and slow down our thoughts is via meditation.

Lee took a sound healing course with Jeralyn Glass, a pioneer in the field of sound healing using alchemy crystal singing bowls and conducts one of the top-rated sound healing trainings in the world. Glass is also very active in the medical community and works closely with The Cancer Support Community in Los Angeles, helping cancer patients release emotional stress and find ease and peace with it through her crystal sound healing meditation classes. Complementing medical treatment with this kind of therapy is an important part of the healing process. “Yes, you get the medicine,” says Lee, “but it’s equally important to find that inner peace within because if you are not at peace with yourself, then your body is not in equilibrium. And when it’s out of sync, your body is not able to heal itself. Scientists are now showing that when you have equanimity within, your body will automatically heal because it has an innate nature of self-healing.”

Seeing how meditation has greatly helped her personally in her life, Lee started doing online meditation classes at the onset of the pandemic, as she noticed that a lot of people felt lost, anxious and uncertain of what was happening. For sound, the instrument could be metal bowls, gongs, chimes or crystal bowls but she prefers the latter as the sound crystal bowls make is very clear, due to it being made out of 99.998 pure quartz. “Also, it really resonates with us because the crystalline structure of crystal and the is the same because we are made of 70 per cent water, which is silica, the core material of crystal. It’s different from a metal bowl, so with crystal bowls, when you hear it, you resonate with the sound differently.”

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