Good Friday
Swedish Press|March 2018

GOOD FRIDAY BECAME A HOLIDAY IN THE 1770S...

Sofie Kinefors

Nowadays in Sweden, Good Friday is like any other holiday when shops stay open late and people can enjoy a night out on the town. Fun choices include indulging in a fancy dinner with a glass of wine at their favorite restaurant, singing or dancing at their favorite bar, or checking out the latest comedy flick at the cinema. But it wasn’t always that way – Good Friday used to be a long, boring and uneventful day.

In Sweden, Good Friday (långfredagen in Swedish) is a holiday which falls on Friday before Easter and follows the Christian tradition of dedicating the day to the memory of Jesus’ suffering and death.

Good Friday became a holiday in the 1770s, and well into the 20th century it remained a day of great sorrow characterized by darkness, silence and waiting.

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