Art Restart
Oklahoma Today|September/October 2020
Supporting Native artists, keeping patrons safe and entertained, and helping bring the community together in uncertain times: The Red Earth Festival is back and better than ever.
GRAHAM LEE BREWER

AS VIRTUALLY EVERY major Indian art market across the country has shuttered in light of the ongoing pandemic, one has decided to forge ahead with strict health precautions: the Red Earth Festival.

Indigenous artists from every pocket of the U.S. rely heavily on the sale of things like beadwork, paintings, and jewelry for income. The markets generate hundreds of millions of dollars annually for both the artists and local economies.

“That’s their livelihood,” says Eric Oesch, Red Earth director of communications. “So we made every effort not to cancel.”

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