The Horny and the Holy
New York magazine|November 09, 2020
Ariana Grande is a singer of many contrasts.
CRAIG JENKINS

NO NEWS IS GOOD NEWS in 2020, a time when the nonstop flurry of gaginducing current events means that to lift your phone in the morning is to subject yourself to a wave of uncertainty. Peace and quiet, some semblance of the humdrum old-world normalcy we took for granted all our lives, are the prize when the greatest gift a wealthy celebrity like Kim Kardashian West thinks to get for her 40th birthday is a calming getaway with friends and family. It is an existence all too familiar to Ariana Grande, who has endured a three-year whirlwind of unexpected losses, terror attacks, new relationships, highly publicized breakups, hit records, and tours—and who has made it through the storm. She is seeing someone new: a real-estate agent you almost never hear anything about, a big shift from the regular Saturday Night Live tea of her days with Pete Davidson. She is writing about finding happiness, instead of venting about her troubles in songs like “fake smile” and “in my head.” “Stuck With U,” Grande’s spring benefit single with Justin Bieber, suggested a rosier outlook on life, treating the unplanned time inside like an opportunity to get to know a significant other better. Her new album, Positions, ups the ante, seeking to dethrone the Weeknd’s After Hours for the title of the year’s horniest quarantine album.

POSITIONS

ARIANA GRANDE. REPUBLIC RECORDS.

Continue reading your story on the app

Continue reading your story in the magazine

MORE STORIES FROM NEW YORK MAGAZINEView All

Torrey Peters Goes There

The author’s debut novel, Detransition, Baby, wades into two of the most vulnerable questions for trans women.

10+ mins read
New York magazine
January 4-17, 2021

The System: Zak Cheney-Rice

The Never-ending Coup Against Black America - Historically, “recovery” tends to look a lot like betrayal.

6 mins read
New York magazine
January 4-17, 2021

The Group Portrait: A Beleaguered White House Press Corps

Four years of history, day after day after day.

2 mins read
New York magazine
January 4-17, 2021

Prom King

With a huge Netflix deal and the power to green-light just about anything, Ryan Murphy has become the ultimate insider. And his work is suffering.

10 mins read
New York magazine
January 4-17, 2021

Schlock to Remember

If you can’t wait to relive last year, Netflix has a special for you.

4 mins read
New York magazine
January 4-17, 2021

Leave the World Behind

Shacked up in the suburbs of Kansas City, indie singer-songwriters Katie Crutchfield and Kevin Morby are making some of their best work.

4 mins read
New York magazine
January 4-17, 2021

Extremely Online: Craig Jenkins

Clubhouse Is Close to Becoming Our New Internet Wasteland - If you love mess, you won’t be disappointed.

6 mins read
New York magazine
January 4-17, 2021

A 1915 Crown Heights House That's Only On Its Third Owners

After living all over the world, Thomas Gensemer and Gabe Brotman settled down in a Brooklyn place with “a bit of an English feel to it.”

3 mins read
New York magazine
January 4-17, 2021

220 minutes with … Sarah McBride

Strolling Wilmington with Delaware’s history-making new state senator.

6 mins read
New York magazine
January 4-17, 2021

Total Boomer

A bumper crop of albums made for contemplating mortality.

6 mins read
New York magazine
January 4-17, 2021