80 Minutes With… Dasha Nekrasova
New York magazine|November 22 - December 5, 2021
The podcast provocateur is on Succession and made a horror movie about Jeffrey Epstein. Are her days of niche fame over?
By Brock Colyar

DASHA NEKRASOVA is hungry, and she’s not interested in patiently waiting her turn. It’s after 3 p.m. on a Sunday, but the West Village restaurant Bar Pitti, where she has asked to meet me—it’s not so far from her apartment—is still swarmed by brunchers. So she suggests Fanelli Cafe, the Soho see-and be-seen stalwart, on the other side of NYU territory. As we walk, like a bored tour guide with a map to the stars in her head, she points out all of the New York notables who live along our route. Hilton Als over there. Mark Ronson and Chloë Sevigny over there. And that way, J. Smith Cameron, currently her co-star on HBO’s Succession. Between that show and her upcoming horror film inspired by Jeffrey Epstein’s death, The Scary of Sixty-First, which she co-wrote and directed, the delicately beautiful, brutally intelligent 30-year-old Nekrasova, already niche famous (or niche outrageous) as co-host of the button-pushing podcast Red Scare, might find her way to a more mainstream fame. Last year, Interview called her a “Dimes Square socialite,” and the cool-kid lockdown newspaper The Drunken Canal predicted, “dasha will become the new and better Chloë Sevigny.” It’s time, as her PRstrategist Succession character might put it, to take Dasha to scale.

“I watch you on television!” a man screams when we arrive at Fanelli, as if to prove the up-faming point. Nekrasova issues a friendly hello, then turns around to tell me it’s all a joke. He’s an artist she knows, and she’s just playing “fake nice.” Sensing she’s eager to sit down as she fidgets with the neck scarf under her camel coat, I tell the waitress we’ll settle for the unheated table on the sidewalk if we don’t have to wait any longer. We both order cheeseburgers and martinis.

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