SPRING REVERIE
Lifestyle Asia|November 2020
One remarkable dream propelled artist JOHN PAUL DURAY into finding a clear path to achieving his visions of a career in the art industry and straight to finding ways for others to find similar success
PIPO GONZALES

Impassioned dreams have produced many of the best artistic works the world has ever seen. From Salvador Dali’s Persistence of Memory to Paul McCartney’s composition of the hit single Yesterday, dreams (or even nightmares) have given birth to magnificent works that in ways have touched many lives or in some cases—even better—changed the world. Young artist John Paul Duray shares a similar experience. The otherworldly vision of a tropical fruit fixated on a body's cephalic region was the catalyst to a series of life-changing experiences that even he admits almost feels like a dream.

THE BIRTH OF A DREAM

At an early age, JP—as his friends and family call him—exhibited much of the makings of an artist. He was curious and experimented with every ounce of creativity that he had in any given circumstance. But in the rush of creativity, there existed an indefatigable roadblock ahead. For him, the path to becoming a full-fledged artist entailed the colorful life of a college student undergoing rigorous training in a prestigious art school. His realities at the time could not afford the experience, but this did not dissuade him from exhibiting his talents elsewhere. Working at the neighborhood café, he showcased his talent in the form of latte art and fruit carvings.

Fate would eventually land him a gig in showbiz, and even if it was deemed profitable, JP wasn't exactly sure if working on television suited him. While he believed in his destiny for greatness, he hadn't exactly figured out where his life was going. Was he going to be a successful businessman? A bankable actor? He had many questions in his head, but he persisted in searching for the answers. He delved into sketching his infamous dream, using free time in shoots to draw figures, and even attempted painting. But the response to his creations wasn’t exactly encouraging, and this prompted him to abandon the idea.

SHAPING A NEW DIRECTION

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