ALL-WEATHER WORTHY
Knives Illustrated|March-April 2021
PROMETHEUS DESIGN WERX TERRAVANTIUM STS-AT: A RUST-PROOF EDC FOLDER
KEVIN ESTELA

I first learned about Prometheus Design Werx around 2016. The company caught my eye, and I noticed it understood the spirit of adventure. A deep dive into the company’s website revealed more than a handful of overland and backcountry trips in varying environments and a flair for the classic designs used by woodsmen and sportsmen brought up to date with modern materials and manufacturing.

A company like Prometheus Design Werx doesn’t mess around with the gear it carries and, for full disclosure, as a sponsored brand representative, I will say its gear holds up in all of my own travels and adventures. I’m fortunate to be one of its writers blogging about my adventures and general bushcraft and outdoors skills on its affiliate site, Danger Ranger Bear. Simply put, adventure and exploring run deep in this company on all levels.

FOLDING CHUTE KNIFE

I’ve had the good fortune to use Prometheus Design Werx equipment on the water and underneath it as a boater and diver. I’ve taken its gear to the arctic on fishing trips as well as to the tropics while hiking in the rainforest. I have a great relationship with the company and give feedback on products as my experience with them grows.Well, recently PDW paired with the knife company Terrain 365 to produce something I want for future adventures but was only given a temporary loaner for now. The PDW Limited Edition of the Terrain 365 STS-AT knife is truly a combination of old-school cool with modern technology and manufacturing.

The chute knife design by Bob Loveless, Harry Archer, and Ken Warner is a classic knife from the latter half of the 20th century. The knife was originally meant to be carried by pilots for overt or covert military/government operations. The original knives command a hefty price tag and there are many fixed blade versions available from modern makers paying tribute to the originals. Prometheus Design Werx is a company that embraces tradition and practicality.

“The STS-AT design is very much inspired by the chute knife, but a contemporary folder which makes for a practical daily carry, and of course utilizing a new nonferrous alloy for the blade to expand its capabilities in various environments,” said PDW owner Patrick York Ma. “It is a design which really takes from the past, present, and also future.” The standard chute knife design dictates a blade upwards of 5.5 inches, which can be too large for most to carry on a daily basis. The solution was to create a pocket version of a knife that retained the swedge (unsharpened) and classic lines of the original. I wondered if a scaled-down version of the chute knife could perform necessary daily and outdoors tasks and be equally admirable.

INCREDIBLE MATERIALS

Perhaps the most intriguing part of the design of the STS- AT knife is the materials used in the construction. Prometheus Design Werx is known for its use of titanium in everyday carry items including compass housings, whistles, and peanut lighters.

The STS-AT folder features a handle with a 6AL-4V titanium slab on one side and an olive drab handle on the other. The olive drab color scheme is a great subtle homage to the chute knife’s military roots. The handle has small fullers milled into the sides that provide a secure grip and a little extra flair.

The more I examined the knife inside and out, the more attention to detail I found. The dual thumb studs glow in the dark and help with opening the knife with the ring finger or thumb. The knife opens and closes incredibly smoothly, and one may say it feels “like glass.” That’s close, but the knife’s action is actually riding on ceramic bearings.

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