The Esports Excuse: Why More People Are Trying To Become Pro Gamers
HWM Singapore|April 2020
Have you ever had your kids subtly ask for more gaming time under the pretense of "Trying to go pro"? Or perhaps you've tried giving yourself some excuse to give professional gaming a shot?
Kenneth Ang
Yes, it's amusing, borderline foolhardy and sounds like a situation more suited to the column of a parents' magazine (Or a column in a tech magazine eh? – ed). But it's very real. Think about it: everyone, from psychologists to celebrities, has weighed in on the trend but has anyone ever thought to ask what a regular gamer has to say about the influx of gamers trying to go pro? We doubt it - so here we are. Let's take a look at some of the reasons for it, from your everyday gamer's point of view.

REASON 1: ESPORTS CHAMPS ARE GETTING YOUNGER

Have you ever found it curious that while esports continues to get bigger, our champions are getting younger? And every other day, you hear about some kid under 20 that's made it big in some esports tournament.

Take Griffin Spikoski, for example. You'll likely not be familiar with the name, and we don't blame you. Names aren't our forte either, but you might have seen this guy playing competitively for esports organisation Luminosity under the alias Sceptic.

Get this: he's only 14-years-old, but Spikoski is already one of the world's most well-known Fortnite pros, not to mention one of the biggest names for Fortnite-related content on YouTube. And if that's not young considering what he's already achieved, then I think you might be setting your bar a little too high.

So, here's the point: even kids as young as that are able to get into esports and make names for themselves. This translates to the field having an entry barrier so low it's both surprising and frightening, don't you think? But on the other hand, it's positively tempting too, especially if you're a kid. Imagine making it big and earning lots of money by doing what you love most - it's a fairy tale come true.

Indeed, it is perfectly sound logic from a child's point of view, and it's not their fault for thinking so. With esports becoming as prominent as it is and more pros making headlines from young, we really can't blame people, not just children for being inspired by such achievements and wanting to give it a go, can we?

REASON 2: I WANT TO FEEL LIKE I'M DOING SOMETHING WITH MY PASSION

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