A Blooming Alexis
COWGIRL|July - August 2020
In an ever-changing media landscape, Alexis Bloomer shows what it takes to do it all in a world of working, writing, and rodeo.
By Ken Amorosano

Alexis Bloomer has always been a multitasker. An overachiever by nature, her entry into authorship started at an early age and was not a fluke. Today, she’s as prolific an author and writer as she is an on-air personality—whose knack for telling a good story branches across a variety of mediums. Yes, she is the “Millennial Girl” whose rant on Facebook epitomized the word “viral,” bringing her unexpected notoriety from all sides the of the spectrum in vitriolic expressions that shook her soul. From her early days of hosting her own interview show in Las Vegas during NFR to her interviewing craft for Wrangler Network at both the Country Music and Academy of Country Music Awards, Alexis Bloomer is a media trouper. She is also a well-known figure among the rodeo crowd, not only for her consistent coverage of the people in the sport for the past ten years, but also because she is engaged to her best friend, lover, and six-time World Champion Bull Rider Sage Kimzey, with the wedding ceremony later this fall. We caught up with the dynamic and well-spoken entrepreneur at her and her fiancé’s home in Salado, Texas, to learn firsthand what drives this young journalist and what her future holds.

CG: Tell us a little bit about growing up Bloomer.

AB: Growing up Bloomer … goodness. I grew up in a really hard working family and I think that instilled in me at a young age that you have to sacrifice and work for everything you have. When my dad started Bloomer Trailers, we lived in a trailer house; it was not glamorous. He picked sunflowers and sold everything he had to start Bloomer.

When I was younger, I wanted to blaze my own trail. But as I grew older, I realized what the Bloomer name meant because I’m representing something a lot bigger than myself. My dad is the hardest worker I know, my mom works at Bloomer, and my brother does as well, and so it’s really a family tradition.

CG: Being in the industry, you should have been groomed to be a horse person. Why journalism instead?

AB: My parents never pushed me in any direction growing up. I never was told, “Hey, you have to be this.” I was obsessed with cheerleading; I wanted to cheer in college and that was what I set out for. I did gymnastics seven days a week, and when I was a cheerleader, my dad would be in the stands cheering me on.

I showed horses some at the county fair and did all that stuff, but it never was something that I was really interested in. I knew from a young age, however, that I wanted to do something in this industry that really would make a difference.

I knew that God put me in this place because he really wanted me to speak to others through my voice. I feel like I have a different dynamic because I can reach a large audience that’s not just rodeo. I knew early on that this is where I was meant to be; I’m supposed to be a journalist. And I was always very enamored with the concept of telling someone’s story.

CG: What was the spark you remember most about your introduction to storytelling?

AB: When I was a little girl, my dad had a plant in Lamar, Texas, and I went to work with him one day and while there, wrote my first book. It was called Little Black Horse, and I took pictures out of AQHA magazines and cut them up and copied it on a Xerox copier and put it together. It said “by Alexis Bloomer,” and I was so proud of that book as a little girl.

CG: Tell us about your path through college.

AB: At the time I still wanted to cheer and Sam Houston State University had a great program, but it was their Dan Rather School of Journalism that got me hooked. I knew from the start that I wanted that scholarship. I wanted to intern with Dan Rather and be in New York with him. So I forgot all about cheerleading and focused on this program 100 percent.

In my junior year of college, Randy Bernard [former CEO of Professional Bull Riders and IndyCar, and currently co-managing Garth Brooks] approached me when I had my stage interview show in Las Vegas. He asked if I would host my own Sirius XM show and I agreed. The show was actually aired out of the broadcasting school at Sam Houston.

All the while in college, I was not just reporting rodeo. I did the rodeo team stuff and my Las Vegas show, but I was also the student that had to report on politics, local, outside of the courthouse. I was the girl in the rain reporting after tornadoes. I did everything I could possibly do, including interning for Dan Rather in New York.

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