MASTER BARTON BOEHM'S PATH TO PEACE
American Survival Guide|September 2020
THERE’S MORE TO MARTIAL ARTS THAN KICKS AND STRIKES.
CHRISTOPHER NYERGES
Barton Boehm held his left palm forward. He smiled and said he didn’t want any trouble. His right hand was behind his back, holding his birch staff. As the “at-tacker” approached, Boehm’s right hand rapidly swung the stick through the air with a whoosh, striking the shins of the man ... who fell to the ground.

Boehm was demonstrating a simple technique that he teaches in his private Seiken classes.

I met Barton Boehm in the late 1970s through my association with the nonprofit, WTI. Its founder, Richard E. White, introduced Boehm to me as a martial arts master. His path to becoming a master began a long time ago.

While serving in the U.S. Navy during the Vietnam War and on shore leave, Boehm inadvertently met a master living in Japan and eventually moved into his home, becoming his full-time student for five years. The story of their meeting and subsequent time together is remarkable!

As I got to know Boehm better, I became his student, taking classes in his home dojo. There, during my private evening classes, I learned about holds, getting out of holds, falling and punching, as well as all the ways to quickly avoid a fight—or to never start one in the first place. But, for me, the highlights of the evenings were always the discussions we had after each of the workouts. It was then that he would share his philosophy of martial arts, developed from his Japanese training.

MARTIAL ARTS ON TV

“You don’t want to fight,” Boehm would tell me. “People get hurt when you fight. You want to end a fight as quickly as it begins. You want to dispatch your opponent as rapidly as possible and get out of there.”

Needless to say, he wasn’t a fan of the martial arts movies, in which fights go on for 30 minutes, with actors flying from rooftop to rooftop, breaking bricks and continuing the battle in every possible position.

“Don’t get your information about martial arts from watching kung fu movies,” Boehm would tell me with a laugh.

When we discussed the popular Kung Fu TV series, which starred David Carradine as Kwai Chang Caine, Boehm pointed out that Caine often had many opportunities to avoid a fight; and when he did fight, it often went on way beyond what was necessary to end it. Even so, Boehm did say that he found the original TV pilot and some of the very first episodes of some value.

Continue reading your story on the app

Continue reading your story in the magazine

RELATED STORIES

THE SUZUKI HAYABUSA

Suzuki said the first Hayabusa invented a new category called Ultimate Sport. We said, “Yeah, right,”…until we rode it.

5 mins read
Cycle World
Issue 4 - 2020

FORBIDDEN FRUIT

WITH CLASSIC 4X4 DESIGN CUES AND AN OLD-SCHOOL 4X4 DRIVELINE IN A PINT-SIZE PACKAGE, IT’S LIKE DRIVING THE JEEP WRANGLER’S LITTLE BROTHER. BUT IT’S NOT FOR SALE HERE.

5 mins read
Motor Trend
January 2021

Radical Rerun

Going under the sword with the 2020 Suzuki Katana

9 mins read
Cycle World
Issue 2 - 2020

DESIGN MACHT MUT(H)

How a German designer came to forge Suzuki’s sharpest sword

5 mins read
Cycle World
Issue 2 - 2020

One Hell of A Week Hellas Rally Raid, Greece

I started riding motorcycles some six years ago in Peru, and it wasn’t because I was always a die-hard moto fan or knew anything about bikes.

10 mins read
Adventure Motorcycle (ADVMoto)
November-December 2020

Toyota, Suzuki Partnering In Self-driving Car Technology

Japan’s top automaker, Toyota, and smaller rival Suzuki are partnering in the development of self-driving car technology, as manufacturers around the world grapple with innovations in the industry.

1 min read
AppleMagazine
August 30, 2019

Wheels of change

Indian two-wheeler giant TVS Motor Company has evolved through the ages as not just one of India’s biggest two-wheeler manufacturer but also a responsible and ethical corporation. As the world grapples numerous man-made crises—climate change, air and water pollution, and their resultant repercussions—TVS’ policies and innovative approaches can prove to be a role model for its industry as well as others.

10+ mins read
Indian Management
May 2021

THE LITTLE Rig

SMALL IN SIZE, BIG ON ACCESSORIES – THIS 2019 SUZUKI JIMNY HAS BEEN BUILT TO DO IT ALL.

5 mins read
4x4 Magazine Australia
May 2021

KTM 890 & 1290 ADVENTURE MODELS FLOWERS IN THE DIRT

How many times in your life do you have the perfect ride? A ride when the weather is just right, the roads just right, the scenery beyond belief, the traffic thin, the right bike under your bum and - the cherry on top - the destination at the end one of anticipation and in an environment that one feels totally at ease and amongst equals?

10 mins read
Bike SA
May 2021

LEAF IT OUT

THE SUZUKI LS650 IS PERHAPS BEST KNOWN FOR HAVING ONE OF THE LEAST SUITED AND MOST RANDOM MODEL NAMES IN MOTORCYCLING HISTORY – THE SAVAGE.

2 mins read
Back Street Heroes
May 2021