Glasgow School in the Bathroom
Old House Journal|January - February 2021
A tutorial in bracing color and geometric, stylized forms.
Patricia Poore

This cool, clean bathroom was designed by the English tile company Original Style, and photographed in Devon. Its design evokes the era of Charles Rennie Mackintosh and the Glasgow School of architecture and art—a fusion of Arts & Crafts, Art Nouveau, and early Modernist design. Mackintosh (1868–1928) was a Scottish architect and designer, watercolorist, and fine artist who spent most of his career in Glasgow. His unique work blends geometric angularity with subtle curves and abstracted naturalistic forms. The Mackintosh Rose is among his most famous motifs, and the inspiration for the decorative, three-tile set.

This room’s historical look is enhanced by a mirror with a geometric frame, Art Deco light sconces, and an unusual console sink. Separate taps on the curvy tub, as well as a towel-warming wall radiator, are period-inspired and very English.

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