Curtains to Carpets
Old House Journal|September 2020
Textiles do not have to be excessive to be effective. The homespun, damasks, and quilts of early American interiors added color and comfort without fussiness.

Similarly, the American Arts & Crafts Movement (ca. 1895–1930) relied on appliqued and stenciled pillows, embroidered window curtains and portieres (or interior doorway curtains), and stenciled table scarves. While drapery traditionally has been a significant use of fabric, layered treatments may be done in stages, over time. Roller shades, Venetian blinds, and lace curtains, used on their own, satisfy modern tastes.

Oriental rugs have been joined by a revival of Axminster and Aubusson, Wilton and Brussels carpets; ingrain and floorcloths; Arts & Crafts-period revivals; and hooked rugs.

Curtains and carpets, pillows, and fringe add softness, comfort, and texture. They muffle the sound. They round out a dominant color scheme or introduce accent spots for contrast. They suggest a style, period, or mood by virtue of design, color, volume, material, and trimmings. They finish a room.

1. ARTS & CRAFTS PERIOD TEXTILES textilestudio.com

Curtains, pillows, table scarves, and bedspreads created with hand-embroidery, applique, and stenciling, in traditional as well as custom designs. Embroidery kits are available. Also a source for period-appropriate brass curtain hardware. (510) 654-1645

2. COOPER LACE cooperlace.com

Offering the widest range of historical lace curtains in NeoClassical, Federal, Victorian, Edwardian, Arts & Crafts, Art Deco, and Colonial Revival styles. Woven in Scottish cotton with custom lengths available. (866) 447-8055

3. ALAMEDA SHADE SHOP shadeshop.com

Offering old-fashioned spring roller shades, specializing in decorative scallops. Many styles and custom options. Expert knowledge for historical restoration. (877) 522-0633

4. THISTLE HILL WEAVERS thistlehillweavers.com

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