The 10 Most Beautiful Homes
DesignSTL|September/October 2019

Color enhances the details and architecture of each of our picks for this year’s portfolio of houses.

Amy Burger, Rachel Maus, and Veronica Theodoro

NEIGHBORHOOD: Frontenac ARCHITECT: Mitchell Wall Architecture and Design LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT: Unknown SIGNIFICANT STATS: 6,500 square feet; 4 bedrooms, 6 full baths and 2 half baths WHY WE CHOSE IT: “When you reach a certain age, you know what you like and what you don’t like,” says homeowner Melissa Haupt. This Dutch Colonial home, inspired by an affinity for the sea and reminiscent of the architecture of the Northeast, falls into the category of what Haupt loves. “I love the relaxed look and feel, the nostalgia it evokes of days gone by…but I wanted to put a contemporary twist on the design,” she says. First, she needed the approval of the neighborhood trustees, which took close to two years to obtain. “The original design called for a fully shingled house,” says designer Rachael Dolan, “but to serve the indentures of the neighborhood, we chose whitewashed brick and cedar shingle siding.” Each detail of the house has been meticulously placed: the corbels, the scalloped shingles above the gambrels, the copper roof accents above each porch. The front door is painted Fine Paints of Europe’s Navy Blue in an extra-glossy finish. Flanked by gas lanterns, it serves as an inviting focal point.

NEIGHBORHOOD: Webster Groves ARCHITECT: Wilford P. Joy (a “Joy Built” home) LANDSCAPE DESIGNER: Owner SIGNIFICANT STATS: Built in 1927; 4,800 square feet; 5 bedrooms, 6 bathrooms WHY WE CHOSE IT: This Webster Groves Tudor is straight out of a fairy tale with its gray-on-gray stucco and half-timbered face punctuated by the original arched wood door. Painted hot pink, the door features a small leaded glass window that mirrors the one just to its left, which is accented with stonework. On the lawn, pink-and-white chairs from Grandin Road complete the whimsical look. “I just love color,” says owner Tyra Gallagher. When she and husband Matt bought the house, it was painted taupe with a black door. Deeming this color scheme too boring, she painted the door green when they moved in, then bright yellow. When they had the house painted gray, she searched for the perfect color to complement it: “I went through every color, and nothing made me as happy as the pink.” Fortunately, Matt is also a fan of the color.

NEIGHBORHOOD: Central West End ARCHITECT: B. & C. Hartman Company LANDSCAPE DESIGNER: Bill Jordan; maintenance by Bladimir Rodriguez SIGNIFICANT STATS: 5,200 square feet; 6 bedrooms, 3 full baths and 1 half bath WHY WE LOVE IT: Adele and Hank Kaplan have lived in this Arts & Crafts home with pretty rose-motif stained glass windows for 30 years. Originally from New York City, the couple has always felt right at home in the neighborhood. “It was the closest thing to New York,” says Adele, “and we were wowed by the houses.” Over the years, the couple has worked tirelessly on the property, redoing the tile roof, tuckpointing the brick, and changing the shutters and trim from black to blue. “A young intern working with our architect suggested the idea,” says Adele. “She said blue would pick up the undertones in the brick.” But perhaps nothing compares to the work required in 1999, when a bolt of lightning hit the house, entering on one end of the third floor and leaving from the other, burning up the carpeting, taking out the electricity, and leaving large holes on both ends of the house in its wake. Fortunately, nobody was injured. And once the structure had been rewired, the east chimney rebuilt, and the exterior masonry and interior walls replaced, the house felt like home again.

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