Lockdown Guilt!
The Gardener|August 2020
Ask yourself what you did wrong, and then tell yourself not to do it again…
Anna Celliers

Many moons ago I was sent on a 3-day course to learn about ‘problem-solving and decision making’. Identifying the problem (a problem is not always perceived as a problem) required asking a lot of questions to ascertain exactly what was wrong and why. Resolving the problem required as many (hopefully logical) steps to minimise the damage caused, by making good decisions. This course has stood me in good stead up until now.

But since being treated like a kid and told by a so-called ‘Command Council’ to shut-up, what to do and what not to do, what to wear and what not to wear, what I can and can’t buy and eat, to stay at home, and even that ‘Friday comes after Thursday’, something seems to have affected my mind and stimulated the stupid side of me, causing me to make many mistakes over the past two months.

Maybe it is not the ‘problem’ or the command council’s fault, but rather my fear of running out of stuff and out of time that has had such a negative effect on my actions, making me feel that my personality might have taken a turn for the worse.

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