A passion for roses
The Gardener|March 2021
For five generations of gardeners, maybe more, Ludwig Taschner has been the friendly face of rose growing.
Alice Spenser-Higgs

When not among his roses, Mr Ludwig, as he is often called, is happiest talking to people about roses, whether to visitors at the rose farm, talks to garden clubs and shows or at his many demos on how to grow roses simply and easily. Not to mention his columns in magazines and newspapers, his monthly email newsletter, Talking Roses, and the two books he has written.

This month Ludwig’s Roses celebrates its 50th anniversary, the happy coincidence of a passion for roses becoming a growing and successful business.

Having grown roses from childhood as part of the family business, Ludwig has been determined to show that growing roses is easy, and in pursuing that vision he has changed the way that we grow roses.

From bare to bags

Did you know that when Ludwig’s Roses opened in 1971, many gardeners still planted bare-root roses ordered from catalogues? Garden centres also planted bare root roses in oil tins or bags, but many died. Ludwig wanted to sell roses that would grow, and he was the first rose nurseryman to propagate roses from inception in black plastic bags. Because the roots in the bag would not be disturbed, the roses could safely be planted all year round. The Ludwig’s Roses slogan, ‘The Rose that Grows’, is as apt today as it was then.

The best for the best

Because Ludwig had been visiting and communicating with rose breeders in Europe and the USA for many years, he had a relationship with them and so they were happy to appoint him as their agent and let him select varieties from their trials that he felt could perform well in our climate. To this day, all roses are trialled at the farm for five years, where they are assessed virtually daily, before suitable varieties get the nod. That’s why we have such strong growers, like the early varieties ‘Vera Johns’, ‘Esther Geldenhuys’ and ‘Germiston Gold’, as well as new introductions like ‘Garden Queen’,Our Anniversary’ and ‘South Africa’.

Introducing newgeneration landscape roses

Continue reading your story on the app

Continue reading your story in the magazine

MORE STORIES FROM THE GARDENERView All

Easter Basket

Turn your garden bits into an upcycled basket just in time for the children to enjoy hunting for Easter eggs.

1 min read
The Gardener
April 2021

The Malaise Of FOPB!

Living remotely from others leads to a bigger reliance on remotes and their confusing buttons. It is terrifying if you suffer from FOPB…

5 mins read
The Gardener
April 2021

Autumn Splendour

Fiery shades of red and orange make for a bold autumn display.

2 mins read
The Gardener
April 2021

A Haze Of Purple

The evergreen ribbon bush, a compact shrub with dull-green leaves and abundant spikes of two-lipped deep purple flowers with darker purple spots, is a selection derived from Hypoestes aristata and was developed at the Walter Sisulu National Botanical garden. It carries the apt varietal name of ‘Purple Haze’ and is widely cultivated in gardens all over the country.

1 min read
The Gardener
April 2021

The Allure Of Lavender!

This herbaceous plant, a member of the mint family Lamiaceae, is so famous that its common name is even used to describe a colour. Most of us will associate the term lavender with a gentle shade of light purple that symbolises elegance, refinement, serenity, purity and luxury – the latter two probably due to the Latin word ‘lavare’, which means to bathe and to wash. One can just imagine how the conquering and decadent Romans bathed in bunches of lavender sprigs and flowers, draped their newly washed togas over the bushes to permeate them with the fresh smell, and stacked dried stems of leaves and flowers in dark corners to repel plague-infested fleas!

5 mins read
The Gardener
April 2021

SPECTACULAR GEM

Magnolia grandiflora ‘Little Gem’

2 mins read
The Gardener
March 2021

Preserving cauliflower

If cauliflower was a stock to trade, some would have made millions in the last few years as the humble cauliflower became one of the most versatile cruciferous vegetables in the kitchen. With an increase in the popularity of flexitarian, vegan, gluten-free, keto and plant-based diets, cauliflower is no longer only baked into a cheesy casserole, but spiced and grilled as ‘steaks’ on a braai, mashed, riced, sauced, powdered, blended and made into pasta or a crispy pizza base. There are not many vegetables that can do all that!

1 min read
The Gardener
March 2021

Mushroom plant

Mushroom plant (Rungia klossii) is a bushy perennial with crisp, mushroom-flavoured leaves that are good for adding to salads or for cooking. Steam just before serving so that the leaves don’t lose their fresh green appearance.

1 min read
The Gardener
March 2021

A passion for roses

For five generations of gardeners, maybe more, Ludwig Taschner has been the friendly face of rose growing.

5 mins read
The Gardener
March 2021

Time For Wild Hyacinths!

We told you in January that planting bulbs would be a great trend in 2021, so March is a good time to kick off your annual bulb planting quest with the indigenous wild hyacinths, also called Cape hyacinth, Cape cowslip and, more botanically correct, Lachenalia. Between South Africa and Namibia there are more than 120 natural species (some of which are sold in flower by specialist nurseries), but there are also many desirable hybrids bred by commercial bulb growers that are readily available in bulb form from the end of February.

2 mins read
The Gardener
March 2021
RELATED STORIES

MANN+HUMMEL COLLABORATES WITH FORD ON RESPIRATORS

MANN+HUMMEL and its subsidiary Tri-Dim Filter Corporation support Ford in medical equipment production with HEPA filter supply.

3 mins read
Industry Today
August 2020

8MM-06

WILDCAT CARTRIDGES

6 mins read
Handloader
August - September 2020

Christmas Market Feasts

Savoring an Old World holiday, by country and by river cruise

3 mins read
Porthole Cruise Magazine
December 2019

Building The Future

Founded a century ago, the Bauhaus art school continues to shape the world we live in today

3 mins read
Business Traveler
November 2019

Thinking About Thinking

Raymond Tallis reflexes his mind muscle.

8 mins read
Philosophy Now
April/May 2021

Beethoven Heroico

En confinamiento, la obra de Ludwig van Beethoven (1770–1827) encuentra “coincidencias asombrosas, a veces macabras”, entre lo que sufrió el compositor en vida y lo que en estos días pandémicos puede afectarnos a los simples mortales. Y no se queda en la música: “Más allá de considerarlo un grandísimo compositor, es un referente universal del arte occidental, un ejemplo heroico de reinvención y resiliencia”, dice el crítico Gerardo Kleinburg, quien propone que este diciembre y durante 2021 celebremos el auténtico año de Beethoven.

4 mins read
CHILANGO
Diciembre 2020 - Enero 2021 - 205

LOOKING AT PICTURES

Thinking about how and why people interpret paintings in the way that they do can help you to become a more impactful artist, as TERENCE CLARKE explains

6 mins read
Artists & Illustrators
November 2020

Moral Precepts For Fund Management And The Property Sector

Breaking out of old-order prescripts for pension funds is imperative if we want to change its real-asset landscape.

3 mins read
Finweek English
8 October 2020

HEAR THE BIRDS SING

The silence of the lockdown helped India’s birders expand the country’s birdsong database

4 mins read
THE WEEK
September 13, 2020

HECKLER & KOCH HK33

AT AIRSOFT ACTION WE ARE EXTREMELY PROUD OF THE RELATIONSHIPS THAT WE HAVE BUILT UP OVER THE YEARS, AND EVERY SO OFTEN WE GET THE OPPORTUNITY TO BRING IN A REPORT ON A NEW AEG MODEL THAT HAS COME DIRECT TO US FROM THE MANUFACTURER. WE ALSO KNOW THE RIGHT PEOPLE TO REACH OUT TO WHEN IT COMES TO UNUSUAL MODELS, SO THIS MONTH WE’RE JOINED BY OUR FRIEND LAWRENCE FROM STRIKEHOLD.NET TO INTRODUCE LCT’S LATEST CREATION!

6 mins read
Airsoft Action
September 2020