Taking hardwood cuttings
Amateur Gardening|September 25, 2021
Autumn is the ideal time to take hardwood cuttings, say Steve and Val Bradley, as they explain the best techniques to use if you want strong, healthy new plants
Steve and Val Bradley

HARDWOOD cuttings are probably the easiest cuttings to take when you want to produce new plants. All you need is material from a suitable subject and a deep pot of compost or part of the garden where the cuttings can sit undisturbed while they root.

Hardy woody plants are ideal for this type of cutting, and you need shoots of the current season’s growth that have started to turn brown. Ideally, select shoots that are about the thickness of a pencil and make cuttings about 8-10in (20-25cm) long.

Making cuts in the correct places

This thickness is only a guide, as some plants have slender stems that rarely get as wide as a pencil. The length can vary according to subject: some grapevines can be propagated from a single bud, so the cutting will be only a few centimetres long, while some types of poplar, used for protection and windbreaks, can be 6½ft (2m) long. Pushed 12in (30cm) into the ground along a boundary, these root quite readily and will form an almost instant windbreak.

The key to success lies in making the cuts in the correct places – just above a leaf joint at the top and just below a leaf joint at the base. This is where meristems are located, the areas of the plant that produce new roots and shoots.

The type of plant you want

Continue reading your story on the app

Continue reading your story in the magazine

MORE STORIES FROM AMATEUR GARDENINGView All

How To Add Colour In Autumn

If you want a hardworking perennial for autumn colour that thrives on neglect and provides food for insects, try planting hylotelephiums, says Louise Curley

4 mins read
Amateur Gardening
October 02, 2021

Let's Know About Autumn Pests And Diseases

Get to grips with seasonal problems, says Ruth

2 mins read
Amateur Gardening
September 04, 2021

Autumn Plant Recipes

It may be past summer, but you can still plant gorgeous containers to bring colour and beauty. Tamsin Hope Thomson offers three great ‘recipes’ and lots of tips

5 mins read
Amateur Gardening
October 02, 2021

The clematis supremo

Delight to have plants blooming for Chelsea, says Peter

2 mins read
Amateur Gardening
October 02, 2021

Plants left in the ground

A generous layer of mulch will insulate roots and tubers

2 mins read
Amateur Gardening
October 02, 2021

Tender perennial care

It’s time to help tender varieties through winter, says Ruth

2 mins read
Amateur Gardening
October 02, 2021

Winter moth prevention

Ruth shows you how to avoid maggoty tree fruits

2 mins read
Amateur Gardening
October 02, 2021

Wishing on a Star…

What would you do for the right dahlia? Toby reveals how far he’ll go for one of his all-time floral favourites

2 mins read
Amateur Gardening
October 02, 2021

Oranges and lemons

Try one of the following for citrus fragrance in your garden, says Christopher Lloyd

6 mins read
Amateur Gardening
October 02, 2021

The cottage garden

A traditional cottage garden is just the ticket for Janet and Steve Howell’s 19th century home in Staffordshire, says Sue Bradley, as she explains the challenges they faced

3 mins read
Amateur Gardening
October 02, 2021