Something old, something new
VOGUE India|November 2021
From a mother’s zari-filled sari to found-in-theattic French lace, brides are turning to heirloom pieces to add extra significance to their wedding attire.
Sujata Assomull

Something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue, a sixpence in your shoe,” is a traditional Victorian rhyme thought to have originated in Lancashire, England. For brides, especially in the Western world, this idiom has long been followed, attributing these totems as a way to ward off the evil eye.

In India, wearing heirloom pieces is less a matter of superstition and more a conversation on tradition and familial ties. In a country where gold and jewellery is revered as an investment as well as a symbol of prosperity, it’s not unusual for pieces of jewellery to be passed down over generations. “Brides have always looked to family heirlooms when it comes to their jewellery, and these pieces now have more value as the craftsmanship from those days just cannot be found now. The same can be said for fashion, which is why many brides look to using old borders and zari pieces in their wedding clothes,” says Mohit Rai, co-founder of The Wedding Project, a bridal styling company.

Looking into maternal wardrobes is not new for Indian brides. Kareena Kapoor Khan wore her mother-in-law Sharmila Tagore’s ghagra, restored by Ritu Kumar, for her ceremony. And Isha Ambani Piramal had Abu Jani Sandeep Khosla incorporate borders from her mother Nita Ambani’s wedding outfit for her special day. The last year has seen us reassess our connections and relationships and these tokens of tradition have taken on a new meaning.

MOTHERS AND DAUGHTERS

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