Human Augmentation Rewires The Brain
BBC Earth|November - December 2020
Scientists discover what happens to our neural circuitry when we learn to use robotic upgrades

What would you do with an extra thumb? Master that tricky guitar chord? Perhaps become a volleyball pro or an expert shadow puppeteer?

Scientists and engineers have long been interested in augmenting the human body with extra limbs or fingers. We’ve previously seen drummers with three arms, and robotic sixth fingers for stroke patients. Now, a project called The Third Thumb has shown how the brain adapts to an extra body part.

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