CATEGORIES

WILD MEAT AND WET MARKETS: A GLOBAL DIALOGUE

Wet markets operate in most Asian countries including India. China reported its wet markets as the epicentre of the Covid-19 outbreak in Wuhan and also more recently in Beijing. These wet markets, a traditional part of popular local culture in Asian countries, are increasingly becoming a cause of concern for the international community and health practitioners across the globe. This article attempts to understand how global authorities and their Asian partners are looking to regulate these infamous wet markets to significantly lower the risk of viral and other pathogenic load from these unhygienic wet markets.

8 mins read
Geography and You
Issue 146, 2020

SEA WALL IN THE MALDIVES AND ITS SUSTAINABILITY

The Small Island developing states are particularly vulnerable to the peril of climate change. Sea level rise, increase in sea surface temperature, high incidences of drought and flood are some of the vulnerabilities that loom large over such island states.The republic of Maldives is one such example, which has been publicly advocating for the reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. Despite being one of the least contributors to such emissions, the Maldives faces the highest impact of global warming. Being one of the lowest-lying island nations, it has been undertaking various steps to curb the egregious impacts of environmental catastrophes.One of the response measures taken by the Maldives is the construction of seawalls. This article discusses this, while accenting the drawbacks and benefits associated with the approach.

10 mins read
Geography and You
Issue 146, 2020

TO PLUCK AT WILL: FRUIT TREES IN COMMON PROPERTY

Despite many governmental initiatives, malnutrition in India remains a major health challenge. There is a marked deficit of fruits in the diet of most Indians, consuming much lower than what is recommended by the World health organisation (Who). One of the reasons behind this is the high price of fruits and thus its inequitable access. As we prepare ourselves to live in a world marred by COVID-19 and a shrinking Indian economy, we must think of new ideas to manage access to food, especially micro nutrient rich fruits. This paper explores the possibility of planting endemic fruit trees in public spaces like roadsides and parks, that can help in increasing the consumption of fruits amongst the poor. It also attempts to analyse whether this can serve as a long term solution to bridge the gap between fruit production and consumption in India.

7 mins read
Geography and You
Issue 146, 2020

RESPONSIVE URBAN PLANNING: COVID-19 A TURNING POINT FOR REAL CHANGE IN INDIAN CITIES

The global challenge of COVID-19 is still unfurling. States are grappling to control its remorseless spread with varied success and its impact both on long and short-term scales are still being understood. However, a distinct urban bias in its spread across the globe and universal response of lockdown and social distancing for its control has brought pertinent questions to the fore. Urban planning and the future of our cities in terms of urban life and city form therefore needs to be revisited. In India, the exodus of migrant workers from its large cities has added yet another dimension to this challenge.

8 mins read
Geography and You
Issue 146, 2020

PAUSE AND REBOOT

REFLECTIONS ON ECONOMY, SOCIETY AND POLITY DURING COVID-19 GLOBAL PANDEMIC AND LESSONS FOR INDIA

10+ mins read
Geography and You
Issue 146, 2020

Migrants & borders: My wishlist in a post-Covid-19 world

Former Professor of Economics and Education, School of Social Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi. bkhadria@gmail.com.

5 mins read
Geography and You
Issue 146, 2020

Covid-19: Politics Of Knowledge, Public Health And The World Order

In the present era of a knowledge society, the world order will be shaped more than ever before by the politics of knowledge. In the post-CoVId world, public health knowledge is likely to be a significant contributor. This article briefly discusses the various contemporary public health approaches evident within the discipline: global health, community medicine and critical public health. Then it goes on to analyse country level policy approaches to the COVID-19 pandemic, delineating a tentative four-category typology, based on available information. Finally, it sets out the possible outcome indicators that should be used to assess the national responses.

10+ mins read
Geography and You
Issue 146, 2020

Inequalities in Access to Academic Spaces

Experiences of students from the socially excluded groups in higher education in India

8 mins read
Geography and You
Issue 142 - 143, 2020

Understanding Caste and Class - Categories and Measurement

The caste has been a unique social institution in India. It has also emerged in a new form after the mandalisation of caste in the early 1990s resulting in the extension of reservation to Other Backward Classes (OBCs) in government jobs and also in admissions to colleges and universities. The relative size of population of various caste groups particularly of the OBCs is also a matter of debate. Census does not provide population data on OBCs, however, it is possible to assess it from nationally representative sample surveys. Further, the correspondence between caste categories and class has been a matter of debate. This paper presents an assessment of class within caste categories based on data from nationally representative sample surveys.

7 mins read
Geography and You
Issue 142 - 143, 2020

The Middle Class - As the Class of No Class

An attempt to understand some of the ambiguities around what it means to be middle class in India has been made in this paper. It also discusses the influence that the middle class supposedly has on Indian politics despite these uncertainties.

8 mins read
Geography and You
Issue 142 - 143, 2020

The Antiquity and Continuity of the Caste System In India - Dalit Perspective

Why has the caste system survived in India for more than millennia is a question that baffles many. In order to understand it one may have to look into its past and how it was transferred generation after generation. People in denial at most profess to believe that it plays a role only in marriages. Is endogamy not the single most factor for the maintenance of the caste system? There is therefore a need to revisit factors that have kept this system alive and how it is being nurtured even today. Manifestations of the caste system and the inequality and violence it entails are quite broad.

7 mins read
Geography and You
Issue 142 - 143, 2020

Social Diversity, Hierarchy and cultural Heterogeneity Among Muslims of India

Though the media and other journalistic literature in recent years have projected Muslims as socially ‘monolithic’ and with the same ‘identity’ of ‘Muslimness’, Muslims in India, are as diverse and as disparate as ‘Hindus’. The religion as a thin veneer is spread over a block of diverse social practices and conceptions of sub-continental origin like caste, community, kinship, race, gender, language and food habits. This is why, Muslims in India have largely remained unaffected from social and political movements among Muslims elsewhere.

9 mins read
Geography and You
Issue 142 - 143, 2020

Identity And The Political Economy of Agrarian Change

Despite significant changes in the agrarian structure and affirmative action in various spheres, caste-based exclusion and discrimination continue to be widely prevalent. In the rural, agrarian economy in India, both social exclusion and adverse inclusion—in terms of assets and access to markets and institutions, act as the basis of caste-based discrimination. as a result of historical biases in ownership of and access to resources, including information and institutions, both structural discrimination in asset-ownership and wealth and its manifestations in the market transactions point to the various ways unequal opportunities shape the trajectories of rural transformation in contemporary India.

9 mins read
Geography and You
Issue 142 - 143, 2020

Caste, Class and The power of Water

The Socio-Political Ecology of Drinking Water in Rural India

10 mins read
Geography and You
Issue 142 - 143, 2020

Health & Nutrition in INDIA - A Caste and Class Perspective

The intersectionality of caste, class and gender shapes multiple dimensions of social life in India. The interplay of these factors has a major effect on the health and nutrition status of children and women of marginalised sections. Moreover, women are exploited by the trilogy of caste, class and patriarchy. This feature underscores that women and children of disadvantaged groups continue to be denied the fruits of general improvement in health indicators brought about by the increase in the country’s economic growth.

7 mins read
Geography and You
Issue 142 - 143, 2020

CITY & SEXUALITY

An Auto-Ethnographic story telling of caste, class and Queerness in Delhi

8 mins read
Geography and You
Issue 142 - 143, 2020

Caste and Class in INDIAN AGRICULTURE

The study reviews varying perspectives on the debate of caste and class in Indian Agriculture. It evaluates the emergence of caste and class differentials from the colonial to post independence period. It brings out that class differentiation in Indian agriculture has become vivid since the initiation of Green Revolution. Taking case studies of two villages from agriculturally developed and backward states of Haryana and Rajasthan respectively it concludes that caste and class are not exclusive social categories in rural India. In both cases the middle castes have emerged as dominant castes and unlike eastern India, agrarian societies have dispersed inequality. But division of agrarian classes and inequality in distribution of land are very sharp in Haryana but quite blurred in Rajasthan.

9 mins read
Geography and You
Issue 142 - 143, 2020

THE 2018 KERALA FLOOD: BEST PRACTICES AND LESSONS LEARNT

It is imperative to reconnoiter the potential best practices, lessons learned and way forward from the Kerala 2018 floods, which include community response to disaster risk reduction and institutionalizing capacity building for flood risk management. In order to support this review the significance of social capital in initial response as first responder and the need of institutionalizing this social capital is critically analysed. The paper also suggests a way forward for flood risk reduction.

10+ mins read
Geography and You
Issue 139 - 140, 2020

Multi Hazard Disaster Risk Assessment: A Step Towards Disaster Resilience

GVV Sarma, Member Secretary, National Disaster Management Authority, talks to G’nY about building multi-disaster resilient infrastructure through comprehensive and integrated guidelines by involving entire geographic and socio-economic ecosystems.

8 mins read
Geography and You
Issue 139 - 140, 2020

Predicting weather-related disasters: Towards accuracy

M Mohapatra, Director General, India Meteorological Department (IMD), talks to G’nY about successes in monitoring and prediction as also the associated challenges of climate-related extreme events.

3 mins read
Geography and You
Issue 139 - 140, 2020

INCREASING VULNERABILITY, RISK AND UNDERMINING RESILIENCE: SOME REFLECTIONS

The essay questions current development paradigms, which undermines community resilience. With climate change and increase in the frequency and intensity of disasters, sustainable living is imperative. there is an urgent need to stop indiscriminate development, which exacerbates vulnerabilities in communities.

5 mins read
Geography and You
Issue 139 - 140, 2020

DISASTER RISK REDUCTION THROUGH SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS: VULNERABILITY AND TRAFFICKING

Research shows disasters exacerbate pre-existing vulnerabilities, which are often ignored in the disaster risk reduction policies. It is observed that people who are already vulnerable get more exposed to disaster risk, suffering a higher rate of mortality, morbidity and significant damages to their livelihoods and property. Although disasters do not make a distinction in gender—women and children tend to be the worst hit. The major global policy instruments thus need to align to facilitate and encourage better communication, participation and create awareness thereby ushering in the sustainable development goals under the 2030 development agenda. The paper attempts to highlight how streamlining disaster preparedness plays an important role in reducing vulnerabilities within and across communities.

9 mins read
Geography and You
Issue 139 - 140, 2020

DISASTER RISK REDUCTION THROUGH - HUMANITARIAN SUPPLY CHAIN DEVELOPMENT

In a disaster-prone country like India, it is important to work with a multi-pronged strategy to reduce the risk of disasters. Proper supply chain management for disasters, which is known as a humanitarian supply chain (HSC) can play a vital role in disaster risk reduction. HSCs are different than most commercial supply chains. But many qualities of commercial supply chains can help HSCs to be more effective. handling of uncertainty, optimisation of facility locations, planning of inventory, developing proper information network are some of the issues, which HSCs can learn from commercial supply chains. at the same time commercial supply chains can also learn abilities to handle high uncertainty from HSCs. a properly planned HSC where the private sector is also involved can help in improving the response to the disasters.

5 mins read
Geography and You
Issue 139 - 140, 2020

ECOSYSTEM BASED APPROACHES: DISASTER PROOFING INDIA'S URBAN SPRAWLS

India is undergoing rapid urban expansion. With increasing population, rapid development and infrastructure growth, urban sprawls are the new hotspots of disaster. The article focuses on the Tier II city of Nagpur, which is being developed as a Smart City. The urban areas of the city have been facing recent water/ climate challenges and it is pertinent to explore the future of this city in the backdrop of increasing urban disasters.

8 mins read
Geography and You
Issue 139 - 140, 2020

DISASTER RESILIENT INFRASTRUCTURES IN INDIA

Disasters have been inflicting heavy damage in terms of deaths, injuries, destruction of our habitat and economic activity. While over the last two decades india has much to share about its successful response in terms of minimising life loss—infrastructure damage, however, have remained very high. the economic impact of these extreme events are required to be evaluated, particularly in the light of growing urban and coastal establishments of the country. Citing case studies of vulnerable built-up facilities, this article presents disaster-resilient infrastructure issues in india.

7 mins read
Geography and You
Issue 139 - 140, 2020

DISASTER RESILIENCE - JOURNEY TO SUSTAINABLE INDIA – 2030

Planning and implementing disaster risk reduction requires integration pathways and appropriate tools. The transition from Hyogo Framework for Action to the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction has brought focus on specific goals, integrating climate change adaptation and environment disaster linkages—mainstreaming it across all developmental sectors. This paper examines emerging issues of research and strategies for disaster risk framework strengthening and network development to achieve the designated goals by 2030, as also envisaged under the Prime Minister’s 10 Point Agenda on Disaster Risk Management.

8 mins read
Geography and You
Issue 139 - 140, 2020

FLOOD RESILIENCE CAPACITY OF THE COASTAL ECOSYSTEM: VIOLATION OF CRZ NOTIFICATION

Coastal zones are facing multiple anthropogenic challenges, including the encroachment of water bodies, which hamper their flood resilience capacity. The recent floods in the coastal cities of Mumbai, Chennai and Kochi are examples. Even though India put in place the Coastal Regulation Zone (CRZ) Notification in 1991, its enforcement is a challenge. The recent Supreme Court order for the demolition of four high rise luxury apartment complexes in Kochi, which violated the CRZ Notifications, is an exception.

9 mins read
Geography and You
Issue 139 - 140, 2020

QUALITY OF LIFE AN AYURVEDIC APPROACH

The origin of Ayurveda has been traced to around 6000 BCE. The first recorded medical texts evolved from the Vedas. More than 1.5 million practitioners are using this traditional medicinal system for health care in India. It is estimated that 7800 manufacturing units are involved in the production of natural health products and traditional plant-based formulations in the nation, which requires more than 2000 tonnes of medicinal plant material annually.

5 mins read
Geography and You
Issue 141, 2020

HOMOEOPATHY THE SECOND MOST POPULAR SYSTEM OF MEDICINE IN THE WORLD

Samuel Hahnemann founded homoeopathy in 1796 as a holistic system of medicine where ‘the person in the disease’ is treated and not ‘the disease in the person’. it is perhaps the best alternative system of medicine, which is safest for the new born, the elderly and affordable even to the poorest. homoeopathic medicines are effective in infections, allergies, auto-immune, surgical, hormonal and psychological diseases, in addition to veterinary and plant diseases.

5 mins read
Geography and You
Issue 141, 2020

HAHNEMANN - The Therapeutic Pioneer of Psychosomatic Medicine of Today

In wellness clinics of the modern world, there is an increased inflow of patients with symptoms diagnosed by modern medicine as psychosomatic diseases. These latest advancements in medical science were well documented in the homoeopathic system of medicine since 1796. Samuel Hahnemann was in fact the first to design therapeutic cures for such diseases.

8 mins read
Geography and You
Issue 141, 2020

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