WELCOME TO the BIG apple
Faces - The Magazine of People, Places and Cultures for Kids|April 2020
If someone asked you to list the greatest cities in the world, chances are pretty good that New York City would be close to the top of your list. For people all over the world, New York City is a place of excitement, adventure, and curiosity. It is home to more than 8 million people and is known for its tall skyscrapers that house many of the biggest and most important companies in the world. It is also home to Central Park, Times Square, Broadway, the Hudson and East rivers, the Brooklyn Bridge, the Statue of Liberty, and the Empire State Building.
Marcia Amidon Lusted

But New York did not spring into life as such a huge and famous city. The first New Yorkers were Native Americans of the Algonquin tribes who fished and grew crops there. In the 16th century, the first Europeans came, and soon a small settlement called New Amsterdam was home to 30 Dutch families. One of the most famous American historical transactions happened in 1626, when the settlement’s governor-general, Peter Minuit, bought the island of Manhattan from the native tribe for 60 guilders (about $900 today) worth of tools, cloth, and shell beads. Currently, the land is estimated to be worth $47 billion. With the new island, the population of the settlement of New Amsterdam grew quickly, and by 1760, the city was renamed New York by the British and was the second-largest city in the American colonies.

The British occupied New York during the American Revolution, but once the war was over, the city became the capital of the United States from 1785 to 1790. It thrived in the 18th century and became one of the most important port cities in the country. It also attracted many immigrants from all over the world who were searching for a better life. By the early 20th century, New York was quickly becoming the city we now know. When the independent cities of Queens, the Bronx, Staten Island, and Brooklyn voted in 1895 to join Manhattan, they became the five boroughs of New York City, greatly increasing its size and population.

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