CATEGORIES

Focusing On Labor

Photographs can communicate in many ways.

3 mins read
Cobblestone American History Magazine for Kids
July/August 2017

Give The Kids A Break! Crossword Puzzle

Can you solve this puzzle about the people and events connected to child labor and the issues it generated? All the information to help you can be found in this issue. Answers on page 48.

1 min read
Cobblestone American History Magazine for Kids
July/August 2017

Extra! Extra! Newsboys Strike!

Kid Blink, a teenage boy small for his age and blind in one eye, buttoned his shirt and brushed back his hair as he took the stage.

4 mins read
Cobblestone American History Magazine for Kids
July/August 2017

Dr. D's Mystery Hero - Child Star

Child labor often brings to mind terrible conditions for poor wages, but this month’s mystery hero’s story was different.

1 min read
Cobblestone American History Magazine for Kids
July/August 2017

Dear Mama Letters From A Mill Girl

Lowell, Massachusetts, on the Merrimack River, was founded in the 1820s as a textile manufacturing center.

6 mins read
Cobblestone American History Magazine for Kids
July/August 2017

Champions For Reform

Imagine that instead of going to school 7 hours a day, 5 days a week, 9 months a year, you went to work 14 hours a day, 6 days a week, 12 months a year.

4 mins read
Cobblestone American History Magazine for Kids
July/August 2017

Maker of Masks

They were called mutilés—soldiers whose faces had been destroyed by the war. Some were missing an eye, a nose, or an ear. Some had horrible burns or parts of their jaws blown away by enemy fire.

2 mins read
Cobblestone American History Magazine for Kids
May/June 2017

A Deadly Flu

More than 50 million people, including half a mil-lion people in America, became victims of a force more deadly than war.

2 mins read
Cobblestone American History Magazine for Kids
May/June 2017

The End of the War to End All Wars

All was quiet on the Western Front at 11:00 a.m. on November 11, 1918.

5 mins read
Cobblestone American History Magazine for Kids
May/June 2017

The Harlem Hellfighters

Private Henry Johnson was on watch in the French trenches of the Argonne Forest on May 15, 1918, when a grenade exploded nearby.

3 mins read
Cobblestone American History Magazine for Kids
May/June 2017

Great Facts About The Great War

World War I was the first war that used aircraft and aircraft carriers. About 65,000 aircraft eventually were built and used by the countries involved.

1 min read
Cobblestone American History Magazine for Kids
May/June 2017

The War's Pull

Americans read all about the horrible fighting in the Great War in 1914.

3 mins read
Cobblestone American History Magazine for Kids
May/June 2017

The Great War - An Overview

World War I—or the “Great War,” as it was called—was truly a world war. An estimated 65 million soldiers representing more than 30 countries from six continents took part.

6 mins read
Cobblestone American History Magazine for Kids
May/June 2017

The Final Push

When Germany launched a spring offensive in March 1918, it hoped to defeat Great Britain and France on the Western Front before U.S. forces could arrive.

2 mins read
Cobblestone American History Magazine for Kids
May/June 2017

Preparing To Fight

When the United States declared war on Germany on April 6, 1917, the decision triggered a massive effort to organize, train, and supply U.S. forces for duty overseas.

4 mins read
Cobblestone American History Magazine for Kids
May/June 2017

Women on the Rise

The activism of women was impossible to miss during the Progressive Era. From labor strikes and grassroots campaigns to the crusade for the vote, women mobilized in large numbers.

4 mins read
Cobblestone American History Magazine for Kids
April 2017

Protect and Conserve

When Theodore Roosevelt became president of the United States in 1901, he used the power of the federal government to support an important movement in the Progressive Era: the protection of America’s natural resources.

3 mins read
Cobblestone American History Magazine for Kids
April 2017

Helping Hands

The large number of immigrants coming into the country at the turn of the century led to crowded living conditions in city tenements.

3 mins read
Cobblestone American History Magazine for Kids
April 2017

A Failed Experiment

This 1846 print warns of the evils of alcohol by showing the stages of a man going from social drinker to death, while his family cries under the archway.

3 mins read
Cobblestone American History Magazine for Kids
April 2017

Teacher

The story of Anne Sullivan’s life once it became linked to Helen Keller’s life is known. Less familiar is Sullivan’s life before she arrived in Alabama in 1887. Johanna Mansfield “Anne” Sullivan was born on April 15, 1866.

2 mins read
Cobblestone American History Magazine for Kids
March 2017

Famous Friends

Most people have heard of Helen Keller’s remarkable friendship with Anne Sullivan, her “Teacher,” who first taught her how to communicate.

5 mins read
Cobblestone American History Magazine for Kids
March 2017

A Visit To Ivy Green

In northwestern Alabama, the simple white clapboard house known as Ivy Green has been preserved as a museum dedicated to Helen Keller’s life and work.

3 mins read
Cobblestone American History Magazine for Kids
March 2017

A School With Vision

By the time Helen Keller arrived at the Perkins Institution in the 1880s, the school had changed its name and location a few times. Today, it is known as the Perkins School for the Blind, but its mission of working with children with vision disabilities remains just strong as when it opened nearly 190 years ago.

3 mins read
Cobblestone American History Magazine for Kids
March 2017

Building The Line

Grenville M. Dodge, the Union Pacific’s chief engineer, had the following to say about building the first transcontinental railroad: “To supply one mile of track with material and supplies required about forty cars, as on the plains everything—rails, ties, bridging, fastenings, all railway supplies, fuel for locomotives and trains, and supplies for men and animals on the entire work—had to be transported . . .” to the railhead.

2 mins read
Cobblestone American History Magazine for Kids
February 2017

Working On The Railroad

The transcontinental railroad was the greatest engineering feat of its time. Nothing like it had been attempted before. The project required massive amounts of material and money, and it required the labor of thousands of men working six days a week. Finding enough workers was initially difficult for both companies.

4 mins read
Cobblestone American History Magazine for Kids
February 2017

The Race Is Set

In 1857, Abraham Lincoln was the lawyer in a case for the Rock Island Bridge Company. The company had built one of the first railroad bridges across the Mississippi River. When a ship crashed into the bridge, the ship owner sued the company, claiming that the bridge obstructed free navigation of the river. The case was dismissed after the jury was deadlocked, but during it, Lincoln made an argument for the national support of “rail travel from East to West.”

4 mins read
Cobblestone American History Magazine for Kids
February 2017

MIdwest Hub

Almost as soon as Chicago was established in 1833, it went through a remarkable transformation.

2 mins read
Cobblestone American History Magazine for Kids
January 2017

Gangsters!

A dark side of Chicago’s history has been glamorized in movies and television.

2 mins read
Cobblestone American History Magazine for Kids
January 2017

First Settlement

It’s hard to imagine Chicago, the third most-populated city in the United States today, as ever being an open, swampy plain. But the area near the southern tip of Lake Michigan was once rich with wildlife, fish, and fertile soil. Different Native American groups, including the Illinois, Kickapoo, Miami, Ojibwa, Ottawa, Potawatomi, and Shawnee, once lived there. When the first French fur trappers and settlers arrived in presentday Canada and reached the western Great Lakes in the 1600s, they established a fur trade with the native communities there.

4 mins read
Cobblestone American History Magazine for Kids
January 2017

City On Fire

For years, legends blamed Mrs. O’Leary’s cow, Daisy, for starting Chicago’s Great Fire of 1871.

2 mins read
Cobblestone American History Magazine for Kids
January 2017