Books to Look Forward to for a New Year
Newsweek|January 28 - February 04, 2022
Along with the promise of a brand-new year come new reading challenges to start and winter weekends that are perfect for cozying up with a good book.
By Juliana Pignataro, Illustrations by Getty; All book jackets courtesy of publisher

Along with the promise of a brand-new year come new reading challenges to start and winter weekends that are perfect for cozying up with a good book. Luckily, Newsweek has recommendations for enticing new reads coming out in the next few months. From crime-solving theater troupe protagonists to a century-spanning Australian epic, and a year in the life of an E.R. doctor during the pandemic to the journals of Alice Walker, reserve these 22 picks at your library or pre-order now so you’ll have a steady supply of great fiction and nonfiction to start 2022 off right.

Fiction

Wahala

By Nikki May | January | Custom House $27.99

An exciting debut likened to Sex and the City for our current moment centers on three Anglo-Nigerian best friends and a fourth woman who emerges onto their scene and roils the group. Exciting and razor sharp, we predict Wahala will be on all this year’s “best of” lists.

Take My Hand

By Dolen Perkins-Valdez | April | Berkley $27

A Black nurse working at a family clinic in ’70s Alabama discovers two poor, young girls are being prescribed birth control in this impressive historical epic. Valdez’s story and characters are deeply affecting and call attention to the importance of recognizing history’s dark moments.

This Might Hurt

By Stephanie Wrobel | February | Berkley $26

The mastermind behind last year’s Darling Rose Gold returns with a second, equally sinister feat. This Might Hurt starts as a slow burn that crackles with sinister energy as we’re brought to the serene, unplugged oasis of Wisewood. Bring your troubles and you will certainly leave them behind. But what’s behind the tranquil facade? Fans of Liane Moriarty’s Seven Perfect Strangers will adore this.

The Return of Faraz Ali

By Aamina Ahmad | April | Riverhead Books $27

This beautiful, atmospheric debut unfolds in Lahore, Pakistan, where our protagonist, Faraz, is born but then abducted. Years later, as an adult, Faraz is sent back to the red-light district of his birth at the behest of Wajid, his father, to cover up the murder of a young girl. Now the head of the police station, Faraz finds he is unable to complete the task handed to him by Wajid in a thought-provoking tale of identity.

How High We Go in the Dark

By Sequoia Nagamatsu | January | William Morrow $27.99

A debut that defies expectation and neat categorization, How High We Go in the Dark spans space and time with awe-inspiring scope. It begins in 2030 when a plague is unleashed in the Arctic. The story ripples across the globe like a wave, equally moving and powerful.

No Land to Light On

By Yara Zgheib | January | Atria Books $26

A young Syrian couple anxiously awaits the birth of their first child when their family is wrenched apart by a travel ban. With raw emotion and aching clarity, Zgheib depicts a family trying to make its way back to each other as powers beyond their control shift their lives like gale force winds.

Notes on an Execution

By Danya Kukafka | January | William Morrow $27.99

This distinctive take turns the overdone serial killer trope on its head, making it more palatable, more intelligent and more emotional. Kukafka portrays a sinister man through the perspectives of the women who knew and loved him, with subtle but shattering truths peppered throughout.

Young Mungo

By Douglas Stuart | April | Grove Hardcover $27

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