The Pros And Cons Of Drip Irrigation
Farmer's Weekly|June 18, 2021
Drip irrigation saves water and electricity, but is not suitable for all crop types. So make sure you end up with the right system, says Bill Kerr.
Bill Kerr

Many types of irrigation are available; it will pay you to explore all the options carefully before making a commitment.

It is well known, for example, that drip irrigation uses less water than other systems. Some farmers choose it based on this fact alone, and end up paying the price for not doing their homework.

A farmer told me recently that he planned to use this system on his broccoli and cauliflower. I pointed out to him that, although he would indeed save water, he needed to keep his brassicas cool during heatwaves for these crops to perform, and drip irrigation did not perform this vital function.

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