Know The Needs Of Seedlings
Farmer's Weekly|September 04, 2020
Different species of seedlings face different hazards and have differing needs; it is wise to take note of these so as to be prepared.
Bill Kerr

For example, seedlings of the pumpkin family, which includes marrows, gems and so forth, prefer to be sown directly rather than planted as seedlings.

Sometimes, however, there is an advantage in using cavity seedlings, such as when you want to get the crop in as soon as the danger of frost has passed. By doing so, you can gain a couple of weeks’ advantage on the market. But if you miss the correct transplant window, this can backfire and the plants will remain in limbo for a while before developing further.

Sometimes, farmers have seedlings produced for the first planting and direct seed for the second. If the seedlings are slightly overgrown, the later, seeded crop is likely to catch up to the transplants.

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